Commands by merckseo (0)

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Use lynx to run repeating website actions
This command will tell lynx to read keystrokes from the specified file - which can be used in a cronjob to auto-login on websites that give you points for logging in once a day *cough cough* (which is why I used -accept_all_cookies). For creating your keystroke file, use: $ lynx -cmd_log yourfile

Convert filenames from ISO-8859-1 to UTF-8
Nothing advanced, it just finds filenames that are stored with ISO-8859-1 characters and and converts those into UTF-8. Recommended to use without the --notest flag first so you can see what will be changed.

Delete only binary files in a directory
Please note that binary file checking is NOT perfect. So, use it with caution. It does not delete hidden files whose name has a leading '.' character. And it regards an empty file as a binary file.

Postpone a command [zsh]
When writing on the command line of zsh, by pressing Alt+q the command will be cleaned, and you can insert another one. The command you were writing will be recorder, and pasted on the prompt immediately after the "interrupting" command is inserted.

List 10 largest directories in current directory
Directories listed in human-readable format

Use file(1) to view device information
file(1) can print details about certain devices in the /dev/ directory (block devices in this example). This helped me to know at a glance the location and revision of my bootloader, UUIDs, filesystem status, which partitions were primaries / logicals, etc.. without running several commands. See also: $ file -s /dev/dm-* $ file -s /dev/cciss/* etc..

Get acurate memory usage of a Process in MegaBytes

take execution time of several commands
The last ; is important. example: time { rm -rf /folder/bar && mkdir -p /folder/bar ; echo "done" ; } command is a bash builtin

Rename files in batch

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him


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