Commands by zwergnase (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Watch how fast the files in a drive are being deleted
This can be useful when a large remove operation is taking place.

Add line number count as C-style comments
I often find the need to number enumerations and other lists when programming. With this command, create a new file called 'inputfile' with the text you want to number. Paste the contents of 'outputfile' back into your source file and fix the tabbing if necessary. You can also change this to output hex numbering by changing the "%02d" to "%02x". If you need to start at 0 replace "NR" with "NR-1". I adapted this from http://osxdaily.com/2010/05/20/easily-add-line-numbers-to-a-text-file/.

Play random music from blip.fm

Do a search-and-replace in a file after making a backup
sed already has an option for editing files in place and making backup copies of the old file. -i will edit a file in place and if you give it an argument, it will make a backup file using that string as an extension.

Get MX records for a domain

Show your current network interface in use

Clone current directory into /destination verbosely
Copy every file from current directory to destination preserving modification time.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Syntax Highlight your Perl code
This uses Text::Highlight to output the specified Perl file with syntax highlighting. A better alternative is my App::perlhl - find it on the CPAN: http://p3rl.org/App::perlhl

List apache2 virtualhosts
Lists virtualhosts currently enabled for apache2, showing the ServerName:port, conf file and DocumentRoot


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