alias sudo='sudo '

Preserve existing aliases on sudo commands

If you want to carry on your aliases while using sudo, put this into a file which will be parsed when logging in.
Sample Output
#alias la='ls -la'
#alias la
la='ls -la'
#sudo la
sudo: la: command not found
#alias sudo='sudo '
#sudo la
insgesamt 28
drwxr-xr-x 3 user user 4096 18. Aug 08:57 .
drwx------ 71 user user 20480 29. Dez 14:25 ..
drwxr-xr-x 3 user user 4096 18. Aug 08:57 .metadata

0
2012-03-04 20:02:38

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What do you think?

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