shows whether your CPU supports 64bit mode

grep -q ' lm ' /proc/cpuinfo; [ $? -eq 0 ] && echo '64bit supported'
it shows whether your CPU supports 64 bit (x86-64) mode. uname -a only shows whether you have 64 bit (x86-64) or 32bit (i386) OS installed, this one-liner answers question: Can I install 64bit OS on this machine?

0
By: mzet
2013-01-24 21:41:56

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  • CPU flags: rm --> 16-bit processor (real mode) tm --> 32-bit processor (? mode) lm --> 64-bit processor (long mode)


    1
    cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep " lm " > /dev/null && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits
    agd · 2013-02-11 22:54:26 0
  • CPU flags: rm --> 16-bit processor (real mode) tm --> 32-bit processor (? mode) lm --> 64-bit processor (long mode)


    -4
    if [[ lm = $(cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep " lm ") ]] ; then echo "64 bits" ; else echo "32 bits" ; fi
    agd · 2013-02-11 22:40:46 0
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    ringzero · 2011-07-11 10:29:34 0
  • Check if you have 64bit by looking for "lm" in cpuinfo. lm stands for "long mem". This can also be used without being root.


    4
    if cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep " lm " &> /dev/null; then echo "Got 64bit" ; fi
    xeor · 2010-04-10 15:31:58 3

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