Bash to add color to your Linux command line

PS1="\[\e[37;40m\][\[\e[32;40m\]\u\[\e[37;40m\]@\h \[\e[35;40m\]\W\[\e [0m\]]\\$ \[\e[33;40m\]"

0
By: cjc
2013-03-02 11:02:14

These Might Interest You

  • I put that line in my .bash_profile (OS X) and .bashrc (Linux). Here is a summary of what the \char means: n=new line, u=user name, h=host, !=history number, w=current work directory The \[\e[32m\] sequence set the text to bright green and \[\e[0m\] returns to normal color. For more information on what you can set in your bash prompt, google 'bash prompt'


    7
    export PS1='\n[\u@\h \! \w]\n\[\e[32m\]$ \[\e[0m\]'
    haivu · 2009-03-09 15:34:22 0
  • Same as http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5876, but for bash. This will show a numerical value for each of the 256 colors in bash. Everything in the command is a bash builtin, so it should run on any platform where bash is installed. Prints one color per line. If someone is interested in formatting the output, paste the alternative.


    45
    for code in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${code}m $code: Test"; done
    scribe · 2010-06-19 02:14:42 4
  • hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; } hb blinks, hc does a reverse color with background.. both very nice. hc(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 0;tput setab 6`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; } Run this: command ps -Hacl -F S -A f | hc ".*$PPID.*" | hb ".*$$.*" Your welcome ;) From my bash profile - http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    -2
    hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; }
    AskApache · 2010-04-07 08:45:26 1
  • Unlike other methods that use pipes and exec software like tr or sed or subshells, this is an extremely fast way to print a line and will always be able to detect the terminal width or else defaults to 80. It uses bash builtins for printf and echo and works with printf that supports the non-POSIX `-v` option to store result to var instead of printing to stdout. Here it is in a function that lets you change the line character to use and the length with args, it also supports color escape sequences with the echo -e option. function L() { local l=; builtin printf -vl "%${2:-${COLUMNS:-`tput cols 2>&-||echo 80`}}s\n" && echo -e "${l// /${1:-=}}"; } With color: L "`tput setaf 3`=" 1. Use printf to store n space chars followed by a newline to an environment variable "l" where n is local environment variable from $COLUMNS if set, else it will use `tput cols` and if that fails it will default to 80. 2. If printf succeeds then echo `$l` that contains the chars, replacing all blank spaces with "-" (can be changed to anything you want). From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash-power-prompt.html Show Sample Output


    4
    printf -vl "%${COLUMNS:-`tput cols 2>&-||echo 80`}s\n" && echo ${l// /-};
    AskApache · 2016-09-25 10:37:20 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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