define a function for searching bash history

hgrep() { ... } longer then 255 characters, see below
hgrep() { if [[ ${#} -eq 0 ]] then printf "usage:\nhgrep [--nonum | -N | -n | --all-nonum | -an | -na] STRING\n" return 1 fi while [[ ${#} -gt 0 ]] do case ${1} in --nonum | -N | -n | --all-nonum | -an | -na) builtin history | sed 's/^[[:blank:]]\+[[:digit:]]\{1,5\}[[:blank:]]\{2\}//' | grep -iE "(${*:2})" break ;; *) builtin history | grep -iE "(${*})" break ;; esac done } 'hgrep -n' helps in using full grep support, e.g. search for _beginning_ of specific commands, see example output
Sample Output
$ hgrep -n '^diff'
diff foo.txt bar.txt

-1
By: Xk2c
2014-04-02 16:40:36

These Might Interest You

  • By defining a function "gh" as shown here, it saves me typing "history | grep" every time I need to search my shell history because now I only have to type "gh". A nifty time saver :-) You can also add the "gh" function definition to your .bashrc so it is defined each time you login. (updated 2015_01_29: changed from hg to gh to avoid clash with that other hg command. mnemonic: gh = grep history) Show Sample Output


    4
    function gh () { history | grep $* ; } # gh or "grep history"
    mpb · 2014-04-02 15:17:31 4
  • I was surprised to find that with RedHat bash, I could not find any comment lines (begining with #) in my bash shell history. Surprised because in Mageia Linux this works. It turns out that RedHat's bash will keep comment lines if in my .bashrc, I define: export HISTIGNORE=' cd "`*: PROMPT_COMMAND=?*?' Why have comment lines in shell history? It's a handy and convenient way to make proto-commands (to be completed later) and for storing brief text data that is searchable in shell history. Show Sample Output


    1
    export HISTIGNORE=' cd "`*: PROMPT_COMMAND=?*?'
    mpb · 2011-10-18 19:58:39 0

  • 0
    function cdb() { select dir in $(find -type d -name "$1" -not -path '*/\.*' -prune); do cd "${dir}" && break; done }
    odoepner · 2017-04-08 14:40:11 1
  • eh stands for Edit History . Frequently, I'll mistype a command, and then step back through my history and correct the command. As a result, both the correct and incorrect commands are in my history file. I wanted a simple way to remove the incorrect command so I don't run it by mistake. . When running this function, first the ~/bash_history file is updated, then you edit the file in vi, and then the saved history file is loaded back into memory for current usage. . while in vi, remember that `Shift-G` sends you to the bottom of the file, and `dd` removes a line. . this command is different than bash built-in `fc` because it does not run the command after editing.


    7
    eh () { history -a ; vi ~/.bash_history ; history -r ; }
    unixmonkey8121 · 2011-03-23 18:00:20 5

What Others Think

why not just incremental backward search via Ctrl-r "" or grepping the history directly?: "grep '' ~/.bash_history
slncommands · 218 weeks and 1 day ago
...now with better typing: why not just incremental backward search via ctrl-r '[command-substring]' or grepping the history directly?: grep '[command-substring]' ~/.bash_history
slncommands · 218 weeks and 1 day ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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