printf "\e[7m%-`tput cols`s\e[0m\n" "Full width highlighted line"

Show highlighted text with full terminal width

Show a full terminal line inverted with custom text.

1
2015-01-08 16:17:43

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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