lndir sourcedir destdir

Propagate a directory to another and create symlink to content

Lndir create from source directory to destination directory a full symlink tree of all contents of source directory, really useful for propagate changes from a directory to another.

4
2009-04-24 18:30:29

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  • Simple and easy to remember, if it already exists then it just ignores it.


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What Others Think

Awesome! I never knew about this...
bwoodacre · 473 weeks and 2 days ago
FYI, lndir is part of the xutils-dev package, at least on debian/ubuntu, which is then pulled in by xutils, which is a basic X package.
bwoodacre · 473 weeks and 2 days ago
Just use cp -rs.
kFiddle · 473 weeks and 1 day ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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