reload bash_profile

source ~/.bash_profile
when editing .bash_profile (or .bashrc), run this to use the new version without having to exit and open a new terminal

-6
2009-06-29 19:26:43

These Might Interest You

  • reload a configuration from .bashrc file Show Sample Output


    0
    source .bashrc
    bbmarek · 2009-12-29 00:14:34 4
  • If you have file opened in emacs and was just changed, the fastest way to reload the file is C-x C-v, as its default value is the path of the file.


    0
    C-x C-v, Enter
    unixmonkey9173 · 2010-04-04 16:06:34 0
  • Reload all defined kernel variables from /etc/sysctl.conf(if no parameter after -p is given) without the old myth "Ah, you'll need to reboot to apply those variables"... Show Sample Output


    2
    /sbin/sysctl -p
    Risthel · 2013-02-14 12:48:26 0
  • The sample output, is a display of the values you can change, using this command. After a change of of these settings you will need to reload the box, by typing...wait...wait for IT: 'reload'. This comes in handy when working with the RX hardware, for example, which has a base limitation of 32 (RSTP (802-1w) instances. For all of you paying attention that means if you run RSTP on a RX you can only have 32 VLANs. Sure, you can have common groups of VLANs, like back in the day style MSTP, PVST, PVST+ (and all that old STP (802.1d) mess), before "per vlan spanning-tree", RSTP (802-1w), was made. But who wants to do all that? Show Sample Output


    -2
    system max <some value>
    rootgeek · 2010-03-26 02:39:00 0

What Others Think

Isn't . ./.bashrc a bit shorter?
hayeswp · 468 weeks and 2 days ago
. ~/.bash_profile
mpb · 467 weeks and 4 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: