ruby -ropen-uri -e 'require "hpricot";(Hpricot(open("http://commandlinefu.com"))/".command").each{|c| puts c.to_plain_text}'

Display command lines visible on commandlinefu.com homepage

Uses the fabulous Hpricot library to parse HTML from Ruby. Extracts all elements of "command' class and displays unescaped text from inside these elements. The following command can help install dependencies (apart from Ruby itself) gem sources -a http://gems.github.com && sudo gem install why-hpricot

2
2009-02-16 15:32:58

These Might Interest You

  • This command modifies the preferences file of Firefox that is located in .mozilla/firefox/*.default/prefs.js. It edits the file with sed and the -i option. Then it searches the string "browser.startup.homepage", and the string next to it (second string). Finally, it replaces the second string with the new homepage, that is http://sliceoflinux.com in the example. It doesn't work if you haven't set any homepage.


    3
    sed -i 's|\("browser.startup.homepage",\) "\(.*\)"|\1 "http://sliceoflinux.com"|' .mozilla/firefox/*.default/prefs.js
    sliceoflinux · 2010-04-09 08:00:22 0

  • -1
    change-homepage(){ sed -ri 's|( "homepage": ").*(",)|\1'"$@"'\2|' .config/chromium/Default/Preferences; }
    matthewbauer · 2010-04-10 21:21:55 0
  • Pros: Works in all Windows computers, most updated and compatible command. Cons: 3 liner Replace fcisolutions.com with your site name.


    1
    set str=user_pref("browser.startup.homepage", "http://www.fcisolutions.com/"); cd = "%APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\*.default\" echo %str%>>prefs.js
    Micool777 · 2012-05-30 18:50:15 0
  • Shows a file without comments (at least those starting by #) - removes empty lines - removes lines starting by # or "some spaces/tabs then #'" Useful when you want to quickly see what you have to customize on a freshly installed application without reading the comments that sometimes are a full 1000 lines documentation :) While posting, I saw this http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1041/display-contents-of-a-file-wo-any-comments-or-blank-lines But it's dirty and incomplete, to my mind My original goal was to remove lines like "\t*#" but I can't figure out how to do a egrep '\t' on a command-line. Two workarounds if needed: egrep -v 'press control + V then TAB then #' /your/file or egrep -v -f some_file /your/file #where some_file contains what you want to exclude, example a really inserted TAB


    16
    egrep -v "^$|^[[:space:]]*#" /etc/some/file
    michauko · 2009-05-12 07:14:48 4
  • There's probably a more efficient way to do this rather than the relatively long perl program, but perl is my hammer, so text processing looks like a nail. This is of course a lot to type all at once. You can make it better by putting this somewhere: clf () { (curl -d "q=$@" http://www.commandlinefu.com/search/autocomplete 2>/dev/null) | egrep 'autocomplete|votes|destination' | perl -pi -e 's/<a style="display:none" class="destination" href="//g;s/<[^>]*>//g;s/">$/\n\n/g;s/^ +|\([0-9]+ votes,//g;s/^\//http:\/\/commandlinefu.com\//g'; } Then, to look up any command, you can do this: clf diff This is similar to http://www.colivre.coop.br/Aurium/CLFUSearch except that it's just one line, so more in the spirit of CLF, in my opinion. Show Sample Output


    1
    (curl -d q=grep http://www.commandlinefu.com/search/autocomplete) | egrep 'autocomplete|votes|destination' | perl -pi -e 's/a style="display:none" class="destination" href="//g;s/<[^>]*>//g;s/">$/\n\n/g;s/^ +//g;s/^\//http:\/\/commandlinefu.com\//g'
    isaacs · 2009-07-08 22:10:49 4
  • Using perl you can search for patterns spanning several lines, a thing that grep can't do. Append the list of files to above command or pipe a file through it, just as with regular grep. If you add the 's' modifier to the regex, the dot '.' also matches line endings, useful if you don't known how many lines you need are between parts of your pattern. Change '*' to '*?' to make it greedy, that is match only as few characters as possible. See also http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1764/display-a-block-of-text-with-awk to do a similar thing with awk. Edit: The undef has to be put in a begin-block, or a match in the first line would not be found.


    7
    perl -ne 'BEGIN{undef $/}; print "$ARGV\t$.\t$1\n" if m/(first line.*\n.*second line)/mg'
    hfs · 2010-03-18 15:46:10 1

What do you think?

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