ping scan for a network and says who is alive or not

for i in `seq 254`;do ping -c 1 192.168.10.$i > /dev/null && echo "$i is up"||echo "$i is down";done

-1
By: hackuracy
2011-08-26 11:09:43

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  • # first install arp-scan if not have it arp-scan 10.1.1.0/24 .... show ip+mac in localnet awk '/00:1b:11:dc:a9:65/ {print $1}' .... get ip associated with MAC ` backtick make do command substitution passing ip to command ping Show Sample Output


    4
    ping -c 2 `arp-scan 10.1.1.0/24 | awk '/00:1b:11:dc:a9:65/ {print $1}'`
    voyeg3r · 2010-05-11 13:12:43 0

  • -2
    for i in 192.168.1.{1..254} ; do if ping -c1 -w1 $i &>/dev/null; then echo $i alive; fi; done
    wiburg · 2010-06-12 18:38:36 0
  • I've used this scan to sucessfully find many rogue APs on a very, very large network. Show Sample Output


    7
    nmap -A -p1-85,113,443,8080-8100 -T4 --min-hostgroup 50 --max-rtt-timeout 2000 --initial-rtt-timeout 300 --max-retries 3 --host-timeout 20m --max-scan-delay 1000 -oA wapscan 10.0.0.0/8
    merkmerc · 2009-06-25 14:12:26 2
  • This is helpful if you connect to several networks with different subnets such as 192 networks, 10 networks, etc. Cuts first three octets of ip from ifconfig command and runs nmap ping scan on that subnet. Replace wlan0 with your interface. Assumes class c network, if class b use: cut -d "." -f 1-2 and change nmap command accordingly.


    -1
    dhclient wlan0 && sbnt=$(ifconfig wlan0 |grep "inet addr" |cut -d ":" -f 2 | cut -d "." -f 1-3) && nmap $sbnt.0/24 -sP
    wltj · 2010-06-22 21:00:29 1

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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