move linenumbers of grep output to end of line

grep -n log4j MainPm.java | sed -e 's/^\([^:]*\):\(.*\)/\2 \1/'
Uses sed with a regex to move the linenumbers to the line end. The plain regex (w/o escapes) looks like that: ^([^:]*):(.*)
Sample Output
import org.apache.log4j.LogManager; 11
import org.apache.log4j.Logger; 12

0
By: bash_vi
2011-10-21 12:50:30

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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