Commands by Cameliagobella (0)

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repeat a command every one second
Short method of "while x=0; do foo ; sleep 1 ; done"

'hpc' in the shell - starts a maximum of n compute commands modulo n controlled in parallel, using make
this oneliner uses make and it's jobserver for parallel execution of your script. The '-j' flag for make defines number of subprocesses to launch, '-f' tells make use stdin instead of Makefile. Also make have neat flag '-l', which "Specifies that no new jobs (commands) should be started if there are others jobs running and the load is at least load (a floating-point number)." Also you can use plain Makefile, for better readability: targets = $(subst .png,.jpg,$(wildcard *.png)) $(targets): echo convert $(subst .jpg,.png,[email protected]) [email protected] all : $(targets)

Write and read HDD external
Write and read HDD external FreeBSD

Print the current time on the whole screen, updated every second
http://www.joachim-breitner.de/projects#screen-message now also supports reading stdin continuously to update what it shows, different ?slides? separated by a form feed character. Here, we feed the current time into it each second to create a large clock.

for loop with leading zero in bash 3

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Retrieve a random command from the commandlinefu.com API
Seeing that we get back plain text anyway we don't need lynx. Also the sed-part removes the credit line.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Show which process is blocking umount (Device or resource is busy)
Instead of using force un-mounting, it's better to find the processes that currently use the relevant folder. Taken from: http://www.linuxhowtos.org/Tips%20and%20Tricks/findprocesses.htm

extract element of xml
poor man's xml parser :)


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