Commands by Dynetrekk (0)

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Record output of any command using 'tee' at backend; mainly can be used to capture the output of ssh from client side while connecting to a server.
Optionally, you can create a new function to do this with a custom command. Edit $HOME/.bashrc and add: myssh () { ssh $1 | tee sshlog ; } Save it. At command prompt: $ myssh user@server

Replace all in last command

List the size (in human readable form) of all sub folders from the current location

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

List only directories, one per line
omit the 1 (one) if you don't need one-per-line

list file descriptors opened by a process
Useful for examining hostile processes (backdoors,proxies)

Find broken symlinks and delete them
If you don't want to delete them, but just want to list them, do $ find -L /path -type l If you want to delete them with confirmation first, do $ find -L /path -type l -exec rm -i {} + Using the -L flag follows symlinks, so the -type l test only returns true if the link can't be followed, or is a symlink to another broken symlink.

Put uppercase letters in curly brackets in a BibTeX database
It is often recommended to enclose capital letters in a BibTeX file in braces, so the letters will not be transformed to lower case, when imported from LaTeX. This is an attempt to apply this rule to a BibTeX database file. DO NOT USE sed '...' input.bib > input.bib as it will empty the file! How it works: $ /^\s*[^@%]/ Apply the search-and-replace rule to lines that start (^) with zero or more white spaces (\s*), followed by any character ([...]) that is *NOT* a "@" or a "%" (^@%). $ s===g Search (s) for some stuff and replace by other stuff. Do that globally (g) for all matches in each processed line. $ \([A-Z][A-Z]*\)\([^}A-Z]\|},$\) Matches at least one uppercase letter ([A-Z][A-Z]*) followed by a character that is EITHER not "}" and not a capital letter ([^}A-Z]) OR (|) it actually IS a "}", which is followed by "," at the end of the line ($). Putting regular expressions in escaped parentheses (\( and \), respectively) allows to dereference the matched string later. $ {\1}\2 Replace the matched string by "{", followed by part 1 of the matched string (\1), followed by "}", followed by the second part of the matched string (\2). I tried this with GNU sed, only, version 4.2.1.

Lists all listening ports together with the PID of the associated process
This command is more portable than it's cousin netstat. It works well on all the BSDs, GNU/Linux, AIX and Mac OS X. You won't find lsof by default on Solaris or HPUX by default, but packages exist around the web for installation, if needed, and the command works as shown. This is the most portable command I can find that lists listening ports and their associated pid.

VIM subst any char different from literal " + EOL with searched string + white space
---- this line ends here but must be concatenated with this one "this line ends here" and should NOT be concatenated with this one


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