Commands by Halki (1)

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Disable annoying sound emanations from the PC speaker
To ensure that it will never come back, you can edit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist Add "blacklist pcspkr" sans quotes

synchronicity
The British Government entering in the Gregorian era.

Count opening and closing braces in a string.
This function counts the opening and closing braces in a string. This is useful if you have eg long boolean expressions with many braces and you simply want to check if you didn't forget to close one.

Synchronise a file from a remote server
You will be prompted for a password unless you have your public keys set-up.

Hardlink all identical files in the current directory (regain some disk space)
Meaning of switches (see man page too): v verbose p ignore mode (permissions) o ignore owner, group t ignore time of modification Disadvantage: If you modify any linked file, this will propagate to all other files which occupy the same space.

print only matched pattern
Print only the matched pattern at the console

Complex string encoding with sed
Pipe | avoid escaping occurences problems in using sed and make it easier to use

Edit a file inside a compressed archive without extracting it
If you vim a compressed file it will list all archive content, then you can pickup any of them for editing and saving. There you have the modified archive without any extra step. It supports many file types such as tar.gz, tgz, zip, etc.

Resample a WAV file with sox
Change the sample rate with sox, the swiss army knife of sound processing.

Display current bandwidth statistics
ifstat, part of ifstat package, is a tool for displaying bandwidth and other statistics. The -n option avoid to display header periodically, the -t option put a timestamp at the beginning of the line. Works for me on Debian and CentOS


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