Commands by Halki (1)

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diff the same file in two directories.
This is useful when you're diffing two files of the same name in radically different directory trees. For example: Set $ path1='/some/long/convoluted/path/to/all/of/your/source/from/a/long/dead/machine' then $ path2='/local/version/of/same/file' then run the command. Much easier on the eyes when you're looking back across your command history, especially if you're doing the same diff over and over again.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Monitor incoming connections of proxies and balancers.
Maybe this will help you to monitor your load balancers or reverse proxies if you happen to use them. This is useful to discover TIME OUTS and this will let you know if one or more of your application servers is not connected by checking.

Get list of servers with a specific port open
Change the -p argument for the port number. See "man nmap" for different ways to specify address ranges.

recursive reset file/dir perms
Good for fixing web permissions. You might also want to do something like this and skip files or directories that begin with a period: $ find public_html/stuff -not -name ".*" \( -type d -exec chmod 755 {} + -o -type f -exec chmod 644 {} + \) ...or include a special case for scripts: $ find public_html/stuff -type d -exec chmod 755 {} + -or -type f -name "*.pl" -exec chmod 755 {} + -or -exec chmod 644 {} +

Read a tcpdump file and count SYN packets to port 80, Order column by destination.

Reverse SSHfs mount,
While `sshfs $REMOTE_HOST:$REMOTE_PATH $LOCAL_PATH` "pulls" a directory from the remote server to the local host, the above command does the reverse and "pushes" a directory from the local host to the remote server. This makes use of the "slave" option of sshfs which instructs it to communicate over plain stdin/stdout and the `dpipe` tool from vde2 to connect the sftp-server stdout to the sshfs stdin and vice-versa.

Play music from youtube without download
same as above but dumps the stream to a file.


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