Commands by SpaceKraken (0)

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When was your OS installed?
shows also time if its the same year or shows year if installed before actual year and also works if /etc is a link (mac os)

Broadcast your shell thru ports 5000, 5001, 5002 ...
run 'nc yourip 5000', 'nc yourip 5001' or 'nc yourip 5002' elsewhere will produce an exact same mirror of your shell. This is handy when you want to show someone else some amazing stuff in your shell without giving them control over it.

One-liner to generate Self-Signed SSL Certificate+Key without any annoying prompts or CSRs
Handy if you want to quickly generate a self-signed certificate. Also can be used in your automated scripts for generating quick-use certificates.

Tunnel ssh through Socks Proxy
If you are blocked or need to use a Socks proxy

command line Google I'm Feeling Lucky
opens the Google I'm Feeling Lucky result in lynx, the command line browser

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Optimal way of deleting huge numbers of files
This command works by rsyncing the target directory (containing the files you want to delete) with an empty directory. The '--delete' switch instructs rsync to remove files that are not present in the source directory. Since there are no files there, all the files will be deleted. I'm not clear on why it's faster than 'find -delete', but it is. Benchmarks here: https://web.archive.org/web/20130929001850/http://linuxnote.net/jianingy/en/linux/a-fast-way-to-remove-huge-number-of-files.html

Password Generation
Produces secure passwords that satisfy most rules for secure passwords and can be customized for correct output as needed. See "man pwgen" for details.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find the package a command belongs to on Debian


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