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Top ten memory hogs
Inspired by #7065

Url Encode
This one uses hex conversion to do the converting and is in shell/sed only (should probably still use the python/perl version).

Decode base64-encoded file in one line of Perl
Another option is openssl.

use wget to check if a remote file exists
put your link [url] to check if exist the remote file

Url Encode
Converts reserved characters in a URI to their percent encoded counterparts. Alternate python version: $ echo "$url" | python -c 'import sys,urllib;print urllib.quote(sys.stdin.read().strip())'

Find the package that installed a command

Check if *hardware* is 32bit or 64bit
This command tell you if your hardware is 32 or 64 bits even if you install a 32bits OS on a 64 bits hardware. If your distro don't support the -q switch, try doing : $ grep &>/dev/null '\' /proc/cpuinfo && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Remove a range of lines from a file
Deletes lines from START to END, inclusive. For example +4,10d will delete line 4, 5, ..., 10. Just like the vi command :4,10d does it.

Functions to display, save and restore $IFS
You can display, save and restore the value of $IFS using conventional Bash commands, but these functions, which you can add to your ~/.bashrc file make it really easy. To display $IFS use the function ifs shown above. In the sample output, you can see that it displays the characters and their hexadecimal equivalent. This function saves it in a variable called $saveIFS: $ sifs () { saveIFS=$IFS; } Use this function to restore it $ rifs () { IFS=$saveIFS; } Add this line in your ~/.bashrc file to save a readonly copy of $IFS: $ declare -r roIFS=$IFS Use this function to restore that one to $IFS $ rrifs () { IFS=$roIFS; }


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