Commands by WalkSuccess (0)

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Find top 5 big files
zsh: list of files sorted by size, greater than 100mb, head the top 5. '**/*' is recursive, and the glob qualifiers provide '.' = regular file, 'L' size, which is followed by 'm' = 'megabyte', and finally '+100' = a value of 100

Check variable has been set

Show directories
Show only the subdirectories in the current directory. In the example above, /lib has 135 files and directories. With this command, the 9 dirs jump out.

Re-emerge all ebuilds with missing files (Gentoo Linux)
Revised approach to and3k's version, using pipes and read rather than command substitution. This does not require fiddling with IFS when paths have whitespace, and does not risk hitting command-line size limits. It's less verbose on the missing files, but it stops iterating at the first file that's missing, so it should be definitely faster. I expanded all the qlist options to be more self-describing.

prevent large files from being cached in memory (backups!)
We all know... $ nice -n19 for low CPU priority.   $ ionice -c3 for low I/O priority.   nocache can be useful in related scenarios, when we operate on very large files just a single time, e.g. a backup job. It advises the kernel that no caching is required for the involved files, so our current file cache is not erased, potentially decreasing performance on other, more typical file I/O, e.g. on a desktop.   http://askubuntu.com/questions/122857 https://github.com/Feh/nocache http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=nocache http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=nocache   To undo caching of a single file in hindsight, you can do $ cachedel   To check the cache status of a file, do $ cachestats

Convert encoding of given files from one encoding to another

Find the package that installed a command

ignore .DS_Store forever in GIT
With a couple of little commands, you?ll be able to ignore the .DS_Store files forever from your git repositories on mac! The following command will add the .gitignore file to the git configuration git config --global core.excludesfile ~/.gitignore then, the following, will add the .DS_Store to the list echo .DS_Store >> ~/.gitignore

A sorted summary of disk usage including hidden files and folders
Same result as with 'du -ks .[^.]* * | sort -n' but with size outputs in human readable format (e.g., 1K 234M 2G)

Get a list of IP Addresses that have failed to login via SSH
This command shows a sorted list of the IP addresses from which there have been authentication errors via SSH (possible script kiddies trying to gain access to your server), it eliminates duplicates so it's easier to read, but you can remove the "uniq" command at the end, or even do a "uniq -c" to have a count of how many times each IP address shows in the log (the path to the log may vary from system to system)


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