Commands by assarbad (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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google chart api
http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?chs=450x200&cht=p3&chtt=Browser+Usage+on+Wikimedia&chl=IE%2834.2%%29|Firefox%2823.6%%29|Chrome%2820.6%%29|Safari%2811.2%%29|Opera%285.0%%29|Android%281.9%%29|Other%283.5%%29&chd=t:34.2,23.6,20.6,11.2,5.0,1.9,3.5

Restart Xen XAPI
Restarts the XAPI service on the host, mostly used by Xen Center. It does not affect any running VMs, just the Xen client tools that may be connected. On my list as XAPI frustratingly keeps running out of memory and getting killed off.

history autocompletion with arrow keys
This will enable the possibility to navigate in the history of the command you type with the arrow keys, example "na" and the arrow will give all command starting by na in the history.You can add these lines to your .bashrc (without &&) to use that in your default terminal.

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

grep for minus (-) sign
Use flag "--" to stop switch parsing

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Show git branches by date - useful for showing active branches
Print out list of all branches with last commit date to the branch, including relative time since commit and color coding.

Wait the end of prog1 and launch prog2

Put readline into vi mode
This lets you use your favorite vi edit keys to navigate your term. To set it permanently, put "set editing-mode vi" in your ~/.inputrc or /etc/inputrc.

Use xdg-open to avoid hard coding browser commands
I rarely use the system menu to start applications. I use keyboard shortcuts instead. Keyboard shortcuts are convenient time savers. To configure the shortcuts I use gconf-editor or CompizConfig Settings Manager (if I have Compiz turned on). Lately I've been using Chromium as my browser. Since Chromium is under heavy development it occasionally becomes unusable and I have to switch back to Firefox. I was hard-coding the browser command in my keyboard shortcuts. This became problematic with frequent browser hopping. I now use the xdg-open command when defining my keyboard shortcuts. xdg-open opens a file or URL in the user's preferred application. In the metacity keybinging_commands I have xdg-open http://gmail.com where I used to have firefox http://gmail.com. Now when switching browsers I don't have to update each keyboard binding command I just change my default browser in Ubuntu by clicking through the menu: System / Preferences / Preferred Applications / Web Browser. xdg-open is more convenient for this browser hopper.


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