Commands by billyray (0)

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Binary search/replace
Replaces A with B in binary file "orig" and saves the result to "new". You must have the hex representations of A & B. Try od: echo -e "A\c" | od -An -x

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Download and install the newest dropbox beta

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Pronounce an English word using Merriam-Webster.com
Looks up a word on merriam-webster.com, does a screen scrape for the FIRST audio pronunciation and plays it. USAGE: Put this one-liner into a shell script (e.g., ~/bin/pronounce) and run it from the command line giving it the word to say: $ pronounce lek If the word isn't found in merriam-webster, no audio is played and the script returns an error value. However, M-W is a fairly complete dictionary (better than howjsay.com which won't let you hear how to pronounce naughty words). ASSUMPTIONS: GNU's sed (which supports -r for extended regular expressions) and Linux's aplay. Aplay can be replaced by any program that can play .WAV files from stdin. KNOWN BUGS: only the FIRST pronunciation is played, which is problematic if you wanted a particular form (plural, adjectival, etc) of the word. For example, if you run this: $ pronounce onomatopoetic you'll hear a voice saying "onomatopoeia". Playing the correct form of the word is possible, but doing so might make the screen scraper even more fragile than it already is. (The slightest change to the format of m-w.com could break it).

Show drive names next to their full serial number (and disk info)
As of this writing, this requires a fairly recent version of util-linux, but is much simpler than the previous alternatives. Basically, lsblk gives a nice, human readable interface to all the blkid stuff. (Of course, I wouldn't recommend this if you're going to be parsing the output.) This command takes all the fun out of the previous nifty pipelines, but I felt I ought to at least mention it as an alternative since it is the most practical.

April Fools' Day Prank
Add this to a fiend's .bashrc. PROMPT_COMMAND will run just before a prompt is drawn. RANDOM will be between 0 and 32768; in this case, it'll run about 1/10th of the time. \033 is the escape character. I'll call it \e for short. \e7 -- save cursor position. \e[%d;%dH -- move cursor to absolute position \e[4%dm \e[m -- draw a random color at that point \e8 -- restore position.

view http traffic

Shows size of dirs and files, hidden or not, sorted.
Enhanced version: fixes sorting by human readable numbers, and filters out non MB or GB entries that have a G or an M in their name.

simple backup with rsync
With this cron, rsync begins to sinchronize the contents of the local directory on /[VIPdirectory] with the directory /backup/[VIPdirectory] on the remote server X.X.X.X. Previously we need working on public/private-keys ssh to guarantee the acces to the remote server on X.X.X.X


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