Commands by broomhaylie (0)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Graphical tree of sub-directories with files
The command finds every item within the directory and edits the output so that subdirectories are and files are output much like the tree command

Randomize lines in a file
shuf is in the coreutils package

This command can be used to extract the IP address of the network.
can be used within a script to configure iptables for example: iface=$2 inet_ip=`ifconfig "$iface" | grep inet | cut -d: -f2 | cut -d ' ' -f1` ipt="sudo /sbin/iptables" ......................... ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- $ipt -A INPUT -i $iface ! -f -p tcp -s $UL -d $inet_ip --sport 1023: --dport 3306 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- $ipt -A OUTPUT -o $iface -p tcp -s $inet_ip -d $UL --sport 3306 --dport 1023: -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Plot frequency distribution of words from files on a terminal.
Uses the dumb terminal option in gnuplot to plot a graph of frequencies. In this case, we are looking at a frequency analysis of words in all of the .c files.

most used unix commands

See a full list of compiler defined symbols
From http://lists.debian.org/debian-devel/2001/01/msg00971.html .

Upgrade pip-installed python packages

Convert all .flac from a folder subtree in 192Kb mp3
find . -type f -iname '*.flac' # searches from the current folder recursively for .flac audio files | # the output (a .flac audio files with relative path from ./ ) is piped to while read FILE; do FILENAME="${FILE%.*}"; flac -cd "$FILE" | lame -b 192 - "${FILENAME}.mp3"; done # for each line on the list: # FILE gets the file with .flac extension and relative path # FILENAME gets FILE without the .flac extension # run flac for that FILE with output piped to lame conversion to mp3 using 192Kb bitrate

Put a console clock in top right corner
Gives not only date but also some interesting status about the System


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