Commands by jmfork (1)

  • It suspends to RAM: you always need your batteries for the RAM but it saves time as there is no need to slowly archive everything on your hard disk. It works fine with me but if anyone has a nicer way, please contribute.


    -3
    sudo /etc/acpi/sleep.sh sleep
    jmfork · 2010-08-03 23:54:49 0

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