Commands by keywave110 (0)

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Change wallpaper for xfce4 >= 4.6.0
Simply changes the wallpaper of xfce4 from the command line. Not for multiple displays.

Resets your MAC to a random MAC address to make you harder to find.
Next time you are leaching off of someone else's wifi use this command before you start your bittorrent ...for legitimate files only of course. It creates a hexidecimal string using md5sum from the first few lines of /dev/urandom and splices it into the proper MAC address format. Then it changes your MAC and resets your wireless (wlan0:0).

In place line numbering
Add permanent line numbers to a file without creating a temp file. The rm command deletes file10 while the nl command works on the open file descriptor of file10 which it outputs into a new file again named file10. The new file10 will now be numbered in the same directory with the same file name and content as before, but it will in fact be a new file, using (ls -i) to show its inode number will prove this.

Insert a line for each n lines
specially usefull for sql scripts with insert / update statements, to add a commit command after n statements executed.

Show total disk space on all partitions
show off how big your disks are

run command on a group of nodes in parallel

Print all 256 colors for testing TERM or for a quick reference
This is super fast and an easy way to test your terminal for 256 color support. Unlike alot of info about changing colors in the terminal, this uses the ncurses termcap/terminfo database to determine the escape codes used to generate the colors for a specific TERM. That means you can switch your terminal and then run this to check the real output. $ tset xterm-256color at any rate that is some super lean code! Here it is in function form to stick in your .bash_profile aa_256 () { ( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`; for i in {0..256}; do o=00$i; echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x; done ) } From my bash_profile: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Randomize lines in a file
Works in sort (GNU coreutils) 7.4, don't know when it was implemented but sometime the last 6 years.

Randomize lines in a file
Works in sort (GNU coreutils) 7.4, don't know when it was implemented but sometime the last 6 years.

Capitalize first letter of each word in a string - A ruby alternative
"-n" loops around ; "-e" executes the given quoted string ; "$_" is the current line ; "split" creates an array on white space; each item of the array is "collected" to be then "capitalized" ; the array is "joined" back into a string.


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