Commands by mightybs (1)

  • First argument: string to put a box around. Second argument: character to use for box (default is '=') Same as command #4962, cleaned up, shortened, and more efficient. Now a ' * ' can be used as the box character, and the variables get unset so they don't mess with anything else you might have. They marked c++ as a function for this command, but I'm not sure why. Must be a bug. Show Sample Output


    2
    box(){ c=${2-=}; l=$c$c${1//?/$c}$c$c; echo -e "$l\n$c $1 $c\n$l"; unset c l;}
    mightybs · 2010-02-26 17:14:52 0

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