Commands by morpheus (1)

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Open Perl module source in your editor
Ever needed to look at the Perl source of an installed module on your system? This works in 90% of cases.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Find C/C++ source files
Find C/C++ source files and headers in the current directory.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Sort a character string
using perl

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

resume download using curl

Clear the terminal screen
works in /bin/bash

Make ls output better visible on dark terminals in bash
Sometimes you have a situation where you cannot properly see the ls output when you are using a terminal w/a dark background. Usually bash has ls aliased to use colors, and you can easily get ls to use the default foreground color via simply unaliasing the command.

find duplicate processes
This command will allow to search for duplicate processes and sort them by their run count. Note that if there are same processes run by different users you'll see only one user in the result line, so you'll need to do: $ ps aux | grep to see all users that run this command.


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