Commands by reyla (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Which fonts are installed?
See all fonts installed in your system

cleanup /tmp directory
Cleans all files in /tmp that have been accessed at least 2 days ago.

Join lines split with backslash at the end
Joins each line that end with backslash (common way to mark line continuation in many languages) with the following one while removing the backslash.

Wait for an already launched program to stop before starting a new command.
Referring to the original post, if you are using $! then that means the process is a child of the current shell, so you can just use `wait $!`. If you are trying to wait for a process created outside of the current shell, then the loop on `kill -0 $PID` is good; although, you can't get the exit status of the process.

Randomize lines in a file
shuf is in the coreutils package

Benchmark SQL Query
Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file.

Simplification of "sed 'your sed stuff here' file > file2 && mv file2 file"

Run a command for blocks of output of another command
The given example collects output of the tail command: Whenever a line is emitted, further lines are collected, until no more output comes for one second. This group of lines is then sent as notification to the user. You can test the example with $ logger "First group"; sleep 1; logger "Second"; logger "group"

remove execute bit only from files. recursively


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