Commands by rickeyhental (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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repeat a command every one second
Short method of "while x=0; do foo ; sleep 1 ; done"

add all files not under version control to repository
This should handle whitespaces well and will not get confused if your filenames have "?" in them

Quick access to ASCII code of a key

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Remove today's installed packages

Sort a character string
Sorts a character string, using common shell commands.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Triple monitoring in screen
This command starts screen with 'htop', 'nethogs' and 'iotop' in split-screen. You have to have these three commands (of course) and specify the interface for nethogs - mine is wlan0, I could have acquired the interface from the default route extending the command but this way is simpler. htop is a wonderful top replacement with many interactive commands and configuration options. nethogs is a program which tells which processes are using the most bandwidth. iotop tells which processes are using the most I/O. The command creates a temporary "screenrc" file which it uses for doing the triple-monitoring. You can see several examples of screenrc files here: http://www.softpanorama.org/Utilities/Screen/screenrc_examples.shtml

Rename files to be all in CAPITALS
Simple bash/ksh/sh command to rename all files from lower to upper case. If you want to do other stuff you can change the tr command to a sed or awk... and/or change mv to cp....

Make redirects to localhost via /etc/hosts more interesting
Normally when a site is blocked through /etc/hosts, traffic is just being redirected to a non-existent server that isn't going to respond. This helps get your point across a little more clearly than a browser timeout. Of course you could use any number of codes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_HTTP_status_codes Obviously, this command can be added to init-rc.d, and more sophisticated responses can be given. Seems noteworthy to mention that the information sent from the browser can be parsed using the bash READ builtin (such as 'while read -t 1 statement; do parsing'), and the connection stays open until the script exits. Take care that you must use EXEC:'bash -c foo.sh', as 'execvp' (socat's method for executing scripts) invokes 'sh', not 'bash'.


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