Commands by rmcb (1)

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Mount a VMware virtual disk (.vmdk) file on a Linux box
This does not require you to know the partition offset, kpartx will find all partitions in the image and create loopback devices for them automatically. This works for all types of images (dd of hard drives, img, etc) not just vmkd. You can also activate LVM volumes in the image by running $vgchange -a y and then you can mount the LV inside the image. To unmount the image, umount the partition/LV, deactivate the VG for the image $vgchange -a n then run $kpartx -dv to remove the partition mappings.

Schedule a script or command in x num hours, silently run in the background even if logged out
doesn't require "at", change the "2h" to whatever you want... (deafult unit for sleep is seconds)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Making scripts runs on backgourd and logging output
Save all output to a log.

Using numsum to sum a column of numbers.
if you, like me, do not have the numsum, this way can do the same.

list files recursively by size

Multi line grep using sed and specifying open/close tags
This line does not include your closing tag in the output.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Find chronological errors or bad timestamps in a Subversion repository
Lists revisions in a Subversion repository with a timestamp that doesn't follow the revision numbering order. If everything is OK, nothing is displayed.

Battery real life energy vs predicted remaining plotted
This time I added a print to reemaining energy, every minute, time stamped. The example shown here is complete and point to large discrepancies as time passes, converging to accuracy near the end.


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