Commands by srikavya (0)

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Quick key/value display within /proc or /sys
Within /proc and /sys there are a lot of subdirectories, which carry pseudofiles with only one value as content. Instead of cat-ing all single files (which takes quite a time) or do a "cat *" (which makes it hard to find the filename/content relation), just grep recursively for . or use "grep . /blabla/*" (star instead of -r flag). For better readability you might also want to pipe the output to "column -t -s : ".

Which files/dirs waste my disk space
I added -S to du so that you don't include /foo/bar/baz.iso in /foo, and change sorts -n to -h so that it can properly sort the human readable sizes.

Binary Clock
Create a binary clock.

Update twitter via curl

switch case of a text file

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

list files recursively by size

Remove stored .zip archive passwords from Windows credential manager
Don't want to log out but you do want to get rid of a stored .zip file password in Windows? This will do that.

Print a row of characters the width of terminal
Unlike other methods that use pipes and exec software like tr or sed or subshells, this is an extremely fast way to print a line and will always be able to detect the terminal width or else defaults to 80. It uses bash builtins for printf and echo and works with printf that supports the non-POSIX `-v` option to store result to var instead of printing to stdout. Here it is in a function that lets you change the line character to use and the length with args, it also supports color escape sequences with the echo -e option. $ function L() { local l=; builtin printf -vl "%${2:-${COLUMNS:-`tput cols 2>&-||echo 80`}}s\n" && echo -e "${l// /${1:-=}}"; } With color: $ L "`tput setaf 3`=" 1. Use printf to store n space chars followed by a newline to an environment variable "l" where n is local environment variable from $COLUMNS if set, else it will use `tput cols` and if that fails it will default to 80. 2. If printf succeeds then echo `$l` that contains the chars, replacing all blank spaces with "-" (can be changed to anything you want). From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash-power-prompt.html

List all accessed configuration files while executing a program in linux terminal (improved version)
Last listed files presumably have higher precedency then files listed first, i.e. configuration files in the personal .config directory will be listed last and their config parameters will be more authoritative then default config parameters defined in /etc directory which are usually listed above them. If you replace ".conf" with ".ini" in the command, initial files will be listed instead of config files. If you do not like to list multiple access to the same config file, pipe to "uniq" or "uniq -c" to prefix lines by the number of occurrences


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