Commands by suhasgupta (2)

  • Usage: flight_status airline_code flight_number (optional)_offset_of_departure_date_from_today So for instance, to track a flight which departed yesterday, the optional 3rd parameter should have a value of -1. eg. flight_status ua 3655 -1 output --------- Status: Arrived Departure: San Francisco, CA (SFO) Scheduled: 6:30 AM, Jan 3 Takeoff: 7:18 AM, Jan 3 Term-Gate: Term 1 - 32A Arrival: Newark, NJ (EWR) Scheduled: 2:55 PM, Jan 3 At Gate: 3:42 PM, Jan 3 Term-Gate: Term C - C131 Note: html2text needs to be installed for this command. only tested on ubuntu 9.10 Show Sample Output


    18
    flight_status() { if [[ $# -eq 3 ]];then offset=$3; else offset=0; fi; curl "http://mobile.flightview.com/TrackByRoute.aspx?view=detail&al="$1"&fn="$2"&dpdat=$(date +%Y%m%d -d ${offset}day)" 2>/dev/null |html2text |grep ":"; }
    suhasgupta · 2010-01-04 15:49:09 7
  • Usage: clfavs username password num_favourite_commands file_in_which_to_backup


    24
    clfavs(){ URL="http://www.commandlinefu.com";wget -O - --save-cookies c --post-data "username=$1&password=$2&submit=Let+me+in" $URL/users/signin;for i in `seq 0 25 $3`;do wget -O - --load-cookies c $URL/commands/favourites/plaintext/$i >>$4;done;rm -f c;}
    suhasgupta · 2009-09-30 16:43:08 12

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Create a file of repeated, non-zero
dd can be used with /dev/zero to easily create a file of all zero-bytes. Pipe that through tr and use octal conversions to change the byte values from zero to 0xff (octal 0377). You can replace 0377 with the byte of your choice. You can also use \\0 and \\377 instead of the quoted version.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

get you public ip address

Create a backup of the file.
It will create a backup of the filename. The advantage is that if you list the folder the backups will be sorted by date. The command works on any unix in bash.

Open a manpage in the default (graphical) web browser
An easy alias for opening a manpage, nicely HTML formatted, in your set internet browser. If you get a "command exited with status 3" error you need to install groff.

Find the dates your debian/ubuntu packages were installed.
Find when debian packages were installed on a system.

Get simple weather info from a zip code
$ weather 97405

password recovery on debian
Appended to grub boot parameters ... gives shell ... password recovery

List your interfaces and MAC addresses

One-liner to generate Self-Signed SSL Certificate+Key without any annoying prompts or CSRs
Handy if you want to quickly generate a self-signed certificate. Also can be used in your automated scripts for generating quick-use certificates.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: