Commands by taxi_innsbruck (0)

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Adequately order the page numbers to print a booklet
Useful if you don't have at hand the ability to automatically create a booklet, but still want to. F is the number of pages to print. It *must* be a multiple of 4; append extra blank pages if needed. In evince, these are the steps to print it, adapted from https://help.gnome.org/users/evince/stable/duplex-npage.html.en : 1) Click File ▸ Print. 2) Choose the General tab. Under Range, choose Pages. Type the numbers of the pages in this order (this is what this one-liner does for you): n, 1, 2, n-1, n-2, 3, 4, n-3, n-4, 5, 6, n-5, n-6, 7, 8, n-7, n-8, 9, 10, n-9, n-10, 11, 12, n-11... ...until you have typed n-number of pages. 3) Choose the Page Setup tab. - Assuming a duplex printer: Under Layout, in the Two-side menu, select Short Edge (Flip). - If you can only print on one side, you have to print twice, one for the odd pages and one for the even pages. In the Pages per side option, select 2. In the Page ordering menu, select Left to right. 4) Click Print.

Extracts PDF pages as images

Go up multiple levels of directories quickly and easily.
This is a kind of wrapper around the shell builtin cd that allows a person to quickly go up several directories. Instead of typing: cd ../.. A user can type: cd ... Instead of: cd ../../.. Type: cd .... Add another period and it goes up four levels. Adding more periods will take you up more levels.

Notepad in a browser (type this in the URL bar)
It doesn't save your notes, but it's great for jotting something down quickly.

Slightly better compressed archives
Avoids creating useless directory entries in archive, and sorts files by (roughly) extension, which is likely to group similar files together for better compression. 1%-5% improvement.

Print the IPv4 address of a given interface

preserve disk; keep OS clean
if you use disk-based swap then it can defeat the purpose of this function.

Mortality Countdown
watch the seconds of your life tick away - replace YYYY-mm-dd HH:MM:ss w/ your birthtime.

What is my ip?

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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