Commands by unixmonkey7743 (1)

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Add a progress counter to loop (see sample output)
For this hack you need following function: $ finit() { count=$#; current=1; for i in "[email protected]" ; do echo $current $count; echo $i; current=$((current + 1)); done; } and alias: $ alias fnext='read cur total && echo -n "[$cur/$total] " && read' Inspired by CMake progress counters.

Show a 4-way scrollable process tree with full details.
If you want a visual representation of the parent/child relationships between processes, this is one easy way to do it. It's useful in debugging collections of shell scripts, because it provides something like a call traceback. When a shell script breaks, just remember "awwfux".

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Create a tar of directory structure only

leave a stale ssh session
When your ssh session hanged (probably due to some network issues) you can "kill" it by hitting those 3 keys instead of closing the entire terminal.

View the current number of free/used inodes in a file system
tune2fs also provides the same information . But the information does not give the current usage , it gives the information when the file system was last mounted. http://www.zaman4linux.in/2010/10/using-up-all-the-free-inodes.html

a short counter
Maybe you know shorter ?

Display / view the contents of the manifest within a Java jar file
Displays the manifest within a jar file. Can use it to confirm version number, etc.

"at" command w/o the resource usage/competition issues
EXAMPLES jb "next sun 12pm" "/bin/sh ~you/1.sh" & jb "2010-08-29 12:00:00" "~you/1.sh" & jb "29aug2010 gmt" ". ~you/1.sh" & jb 12:00p.m. "nohup ./1.sh" & jb 1min "echo stop!" & SEE ALSO parsedate(3) strftime(3)

list all file extensions in a directory
If your grep doesn't have an -o option, you can use sed instead.


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