Commands by zhujian0805 (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Block all IPv4 addresses that has brute forcing our ssh server
For ipv6 use: grep -oE "\b([0-9A-Fa-f]{1,4}:){7}[0-9A-Fa-f]{1,4}\b"

Ping a URL sending output to file and STDOUT
The tee (as in "T" junction) command is very useful for redirecting output to two places.

Show (only) list of files changed by commit
Lists ONLY the files changed by the given HASH/HEAD/list of hashes, etc. The message, commit ID, author, etc. is not included

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Print a row of characters across the terminal
Pure Bash This will print a row of characters the width of the screen without using any external executables. In some cases, COLUMNS may not be set. Here is an alternative that uses tput to generate a default if that's the case. And it still avoids using tr. $ printf -v row "%${COLUMNS:-$(tput cols)}s"; echo ${row// /#} The only disadvantage to either one is that they create a variable.

Print all fields in a file/output from field N to the end of the line

Check reverse DNS
I'm just a simple programmer. I find dig too verbose. host tells me alias(es) and IP address in a quick to grok format with nothing special to remember for input parameters. With thanks to http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/how-to-test-or-check-reverse-dns/

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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