Commands tagged rubegoldbash (1)

  • Just 253 chars of pure UNIX magic, with curl. I created this contrived bash one-liner while building a command-line bash game : www.rubegoldbash.com. Show Sample Output


    0
    curl -s ip.appspot.com | xargs -n 1 curl -s "freegeoip.net/csv/$1" | cut -d ',' -f '9 10' | sed 's/,/\&lon=/g' | xargs -n 1 echo "http://api.openweathermap.org/data/2.5/weather?mode=html&lat=$1" | sed 's/ //g' | xargs -n 1 curl -s $1 | lynx -stdin -dump
    supermoustachu · 2015-02-04 00:47:06 0

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recursively change file name from uppercase to lowercase (or viceversa)
or, to process a single directory: $ for f in *; do mv $f `echo $f |tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]'`; done

Top 10 Memory Processes
It displays the top 10 processes sorted by memory usage

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Find files that are older than x days
Find files that are older than x days in the working directory and list them. This will recurse all the sub-directories inside the working directory. By changing the value for -mtime, you can adjust the time and by replacing the ls command with, say, rm, you can remove those files if you wish to.

Generate random valid mac addresses
Ruby version. Also, a perl version: $perl -e 'printf("%.2x.",rand(255))for(1..5);printf("%.2x\n",rand(255))'

multiline data block parse and CSV data extraction with perl
extract data in multiline blocks of data with perl pattern matching loop

Google voice recognition "API"
The FLAC audio must be encoded at 16000Hz sampling rate (SoX is your friend). Outputs a short JSON string, the actual speech is in the hypotheses->utterance, the accuracy is stored in hypotheses->confidence (ranging from 0 to 1). Google also accepts audio in some special speex format (audio/x-speex-with-header-byte), which is much smaller in comparison with losless FLAC, but I haven't been able to encode such a sample.

Stream youtube videos
Streams youtube-dl video to mplayer. Usage: syt 'youtube.com/link' 'anotherlinkto.video' Uses mplayer controls

Find all videos under current directory
Uses mime-type of files rather than relying on file extensions to find files of a certain type. This can obviously be extended to finding files of any other type as well.. like plain text files, audio, etc.. In reference to displaying the total hours of video (which was earlier posted in command line fu, but relied on the user having to supply all possible video file formats) we can now do better: $ find ./ -type f -print0 | xargs -0 file -iNf - | grep video | cut -d: -f1 | xargs -d'\n' /usr/share/doc/mplayer/examples/midentify | grep ID_LENGTH | awk -F "=" '{sum += $2} END {print sum/60/60; print "hours"}'

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


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