Show and update a log file

tail -F logfile

0
By: dckt
2012-11-15 10:12:20

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    dfarre · 2010-06-18 09:26:24 0
  • # AllInOne: Update what packages are available, upgrade to new versions, remove unneeded packages # (some are no longer needed, replaced by the ones from ap upgrade), check for dependencies # and clean local cached packages (saved on disk but not installed?,some are needed? [this only cleans unneeded unlike ap clean]). # aliases (copy into ~/.bashrc file): alias a='alias' a ap='apt-get' a r='ap autoremove -y' a up='ap update' a u='up && ap upgrade -y --show-progress && r && ap check && ap autoclean' # && means "and run if the previous succeeded", you can change it to ; to "run even if previous failed". I'm not sure if ap check should be before or after ap upgrade -y, you can also change the alias names. # To expand aliases in bash use ctrl alt e or see this ow.ly/zBKHs # For more useful aliases go to ow.ly/zBMOx


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    apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade -y --show-progress && apt-get autoremove -y && apt-get check && apt-get autoclean -y
    unixmonkey78577 · 2014-07-26 12:18:57 0
  • This will update the tarball, adding files that have changed since the last update. This assumes that the tarball is in the same directory as the files being archived. N.B. This command can't be used on compressed tarballs. N.B. This will add the updated files to the tarball, so that the tarball will have two versions of each file. This will make the tarball larger, but doesn't have any other significant effect.


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    tar -tf file.tar | tar -T - -uf file.tar
    goodevilgenius · 2009-05-22 00:28:13 2
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    if [[ $(expr $(date +%s) - $(stat -c %X /var/lib/apt/periodic/update-success-stamp)) -gt 86400 ]]; then sudo apt-get update fi
    gargolito · 2015-05-12 14:45:11 0

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