iptables for mac

-A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -m mac --mac-source 3E:D7:88:A6:66:8E -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p udp -m udp --dport 10000:66000 -m mac --mac-source 3E:D7:88:A6:66:8E -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -p udp -m udp --dport 5060 -m mac --mac-source 3E:D7:88:A6:66:8E -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -m mac --mac-source 3E:D7:88:A6:66:8E -j ACCEPT
Sample Output
-A INPUT -p udp -m udp --dport 10000:66000 -m mac --mac-source 3E:D7:88:A6:66:8E -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p udp -m udp --dport 5060 -m mac --mac-source 3E:D7:88:A6:66:8E -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -m mac --mac-source 3E:D7:88:A6:66:8E -j ACCEPT

0
By: erez83
2015-09-17 14:51:47

These Might Interest You

  • This turns your iptables packet filter to a "Allow any from any to any" filter, so you can rule out any filtering issues when you have a problem to enable a connection from or to your host. To re-enable it, run /etc/init.d/iptables restart


    0
    iptables -F && iptables -X && iptables -P INPUT ACCEPT && iptables -OUTPUT ACCEPT
    lme · 2009-03-27 15:03:54 0
  • a simple command in order to make iptables rules permanent, run @ sudo!


    0
    iptables-save > firewall.conf; rm -f /etc/network/if-up.d/iptables; echo '#!/bin/sh' > /etc/network/if-up.d/iptables; echo "iptables-restore < firewall.conf" >> /etc/network/if-up.d/iptables; chmod +x /etc/network/if-up.d/iptables
    dddddsadasdasd · 2010-11-13 23:58:28 1
  • If you changed the default policy on any chain other than filter table chain's, this won't be enough.


    0
    iptables -P INPUT ACCEPT; iptables -P FORWARD ACCEPT; iptables -P OUTPUT ACCEPT; for table in `cat /proc/net/ip_tables_names`; do iptables -t $table -F; iptables -t $table -Z; iptables -t $table -X; done
    dash · 2011-12-15 18:19:34 0
  • These series of commands allows you all at once to make a backup of your current config, edit that config, then saves it as the running config and makes it persistent. I would advise knowing what your doing to the config before running this because if you mess up say the port 22 portion, you may get knocked off the system. ;) Don't say I didn't warn ya!


    0
    iptables-save > iptables.current; vi iptables.current; iptables-restore iptables.current; service iptables save
    bigc00p · 2013-12-04 18:41:48 0

What Others Think

The 'command' isn't complete, i.e. it can't be run as you've posted it. There's no description of what it does, or why people might find it useful.
flatcap · 140 weeks and 2 days ago
I agree. It should be prefixed with iptables. The title also makes it sound like this is some sort of wrapper to make an iptables-like command for Mac OS X (which uses pf from OpenBSD). This line can be pasted into a typical iptables configuration file like /var/lib/iptables/rules-save (with the correct prefix, usually [0:0] for main chain, but modifying this file manually is unusual).
Tatsh · 139 weeks and 6 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: