svn status | egrep '^(M|A)' | egrep -o '[^MA\ ].*$'

Show the files that you've modified in an SVN tree

This is useful for piping to other commands, as well: svn status | egrep '^(M|A)' | egrep -o '[^MA\ ].*$' | xargs $EDITOR

0
By: isaacs
2009-03-27 05:18:24

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What Others Think

You can use `svn status -q` for that: svn st -q | awk '{print $2}'
tebeka · 477 weeks and 3 days ago
I was also piping the output of svn status into grep until I found about the -q (quiet) option. Using that (and using cut to discard the leading subversion junk as you have) the command could be: svn st -q | cut -b 8-
bwoodacre · 477 weeks and 3 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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