Find name of package which installed a given shell command

dpkg -S "$(readlink -e $(which w))" | cut -d ':' -f 1
Some command names are very different from the name of the package that installed them. Sometimes, you may want to find out the name of the package that provided a command on a system, so that you can install it on another system.
Sample Output
procps

1
By: Fox
2016-05-18 09:41:29

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  • Put this one-line function somewhere in your shell init, re-login and try whatinstalled <command> This is an elaborate wrapper around "dpkg -S", with numerous safeguards. Symlinks and command aliases are resolved. If the searched command is not an existing executable file or was installed by some other means than dpkg/apt, nothing is printed to stdout, otherwise the package name. Show Sample Output


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    whatinstalled () { local cmdpath=$(realpath -eP $(which -a $1 | grep -E "^/" | tail -n 1) 2>/dev/null) && [ -x "$cmdpath" ] && dpkg -S $cmdpath 2>/dev/null | grep -E ": $cmdpath\$" | cut -d ":" -f 1; }
    lordtoran · 2016-11-08 16:13:10 2
  • I wanted to view only executables installed by a package. This seemed to work. There's got to be easier way, please share. Note: (1) Replace iptables with the package name of your interest (2) The command will trash any existing environment variable named 'lst' (3) Instead if you are interested in viewing just .ko or .so files installed by this package, then that would be easy: $ dpkg -L iptables | grep "\.[sk]o$" Show Sample Output


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    lst=`dpkg -L iptables` ; for f in $lst; do if [ -x $f ] && [ ! -d $f ] ; then echo $f; fi; done;
    b_t · 2010-10-30 14:47:45 1
  • The wajig package is not installed by default.


    0
    dpkg-query -Wf '${Installed-Size}\t${Package}\n' | sort -n
    jedifu · 2013-09-06 08:30:49 0
  • If the first two letters are "ii", then the package is installed. You can also use wildcards. For example, . dpkg -l openoffice* . Note that dpkg will usually not report packages which are available but uninstalled. If you want to see both which versions are installed and which versions are available, use this command instead: . apt-cache policy python Show Sample Output


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    dpkg -l python
    hackerb9 · 2011-01-05 06:15:13 1

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