Adds characters at the beginning of the name of a file

rename 's/.*/[it]$&/' *.pdf

0
By: kayowas
2009-03-27 15:12:02

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    sed -e '/^[[:blank:]]*#/d; s/[[:blank:]][[:blank:]]*#.*//' -e '/^$/d' -e '/^\/\/.*/d' -e '/^\/\*/d;/^ \* /d;/^ \*\//d' /a/file/with/comments
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What Others Think

That's a weird regex. Let's try this instead: rename 's/^/[it]/' *.pdf
goodevilgenius · 482 weeks and 2 days ago
why don't you use mmv for this? mmv "*.pdf" "it#1.pdf"
lied · 480 weeks and 4 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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