Find a specific pdf file (given part of its name) and open it

evince "$(find -name 'NameOfPdf.pdf')"
This assumes there is only one result. Either tail your search for one result or add | head -n 1 before the closing bracket. You can also use locate instead of find, if you have locate installed and updated

-1
2010-04-04 20:55:51

These Might Interest You

  • lists the files found by find, waits for user input then uses xdg-open to open the selected file with the appropriate program. usage: findopen path expression [command] With the third optional input you can specify a command to use other than xdg-open, for example you could echo the filename to stdout then pipe it to another command. To get it to work for files with spaces it gets a bit messier... findopen() { files=( $(find "$1" -iname "$2" | tr ' ' '@') ); select file in "${files[@]//@/ }"; do ${3:-xdg-open} "$file"; break; done } You can replace the @ with any character that probably wont be in a file name.


    -1
    findopen() { local PS3="select file: "; select file in $(find "$1" -iname "$2"); do ${3:-xdg-open} $file; break; done }
    quigybo · 2010-02-28 02:28:59 0

  • -2
    find . -name "*noticia*" -name "*jhtm*" -name "*.tpl" -exec grep -li "id=\"col-direita\"" '{}' \; | xargs -n1 mate
    irae · 2010-09-18 02:55:40 1
  • I find this terribly useful for grepping through a file, looking for just a block of text. There's "grep -A # pattern file.txt" to see a specific number of lines following your pattern, but what if you want to see the whole block? Say, the output of "dmidecode" (as root): dmidecode | awk '/Battery/,/^$/' Will show me everything following the battery block up to the next block of text. Again, I find this extremely useful when I want to see whole blocks of text based on a pattern, and I don't care to see the rest of the data in output. This could be used against the '/etc/securetty/user' file on Unix to find the block of a specific user. It could be used against VirtualHosts or Directories on Apache to find specific definitions. The scenarios go on for any text formatted in a block fashion. Very handy.


    85
    awk '/start_pattern/,/stop_pattern/' file.txt
    atoponce · 2009-03-28 14:28:59 7

  • 0
    nmap -sT -p 80 --open 192.168.1.1/24
    smiles · 2012-03-13 01:43:59 0

What Others Think

use evince "$(find -name 'NameOfPdf.pdf' -print -quit)" to make sure you only get one result
unixmonkey8161 · 428 weeks ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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