Find all files that have nasty names

find -name "*[^a-zA-Z0-9._-]*"
Get a list of file names that may cause problems (eg being served on a webserver, typing a URL on a mobile, etc)
Sample Output
./dir/s p a c e s.txt
./dir/bad-chars-!%+[].txt

2
By: dave1010
2010-07-30 09:28:45

These Might Interest You

  • Btrfs reports the inode numbers of files with failed checksums. Use `find` to lookup the file names of those inodes. The files may need to be deleted and replaced with backups.


    1
    dmesg | grep -Po 'csum failed ino\S* \d+' | awk '{print $4}' | sort -u | xargs -n 1 find / -inum 2> /dev/null
    Sepero · 2014-03-22 12:22:46 1
  • Btrfs reports the inode numbers of files with failed checksums. Use `find` to lookup the file names of those inodes.


    -1
    dmesg | grep -Po 'csum failed ino\S* \d+' | sort | uniq | xargs -n 3 find / -inum 2> /dev/null
    Sepero · 2014-03-20 06:27:15 3
  • These days, most software distributed in tar files will just contain a directory at the top level, but some tar files don't have this and can leave you with a mess of files in the current folder if you blindly execute tar zxvf something.tar.gz This command can help you clean up after such a mistake. However, note that this has the potential to do bad things if someone has been *really* nasty with filenames.


    2
    tar ztf tar-lacking-subdirectory.tar.gz | xargs rm
    mulad · 2009-02-19 00:34:09 0
  • This does the following: 1 - Search recursively for files whose names match REGEX_A 2 - From this list exclude files whose names match REGEX_B 3 - Open this as a group in textmate (in the sidebar) And now you can use Command+Shift+F to use textmate own find and replace on this particular group of files. For advanced regex in the first expression you can use -regextype posix-egrep like this: mate - `find * -type f -regextype posix-egrep -regex 'REGEX_A' | grep -v -E 'REGEX_B'` Warning: this is not ment to open files or folders with space os special characters in the filename. If anyone knows a solution to that, tell me so I can fix the line.


    1
    mate - `find * -type f -regex 'REGEX_A' | grep -v -E 'REGEX_B'`
    irae · 2009-08-12 22:24:08 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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