lgrep() { /bin/ls -A --color=always ${2:-.} | /bin/grep $1 ; }

Show regular expressions on directory list

lgrep regex [dir]

-2
By: vando
2011-03-14 16:08:00

These Might Interest You

  • txt2regex can be interactive or noninteractive and generates regular expressions for a variety of dialects based on user input. In interactive mode, the regex string builds as you select menu options. The sample output here is from noninteractive mode, try running it standalone and see for yourself. It's written in bash and is available as the 'txt2regex' package at least under debian/ubuntu. Show Sample Output


    8
    txt2regex
    bwoodacre · 2009-04-29 04:00:22 4
  • This one will work a little better, the regular expressions it is not 100% accurate for XML parsing but it will suffice any XML valid document for sure. Show Sample Output


    0
    grep -Eho '<[a-ZA-Z_][a-zA-Z0-9_-:]*' * | sort -u | cut -c2-
    inkel · 2009-08-05 21:54:29 0
  • Allows for quick mass renaming, assuming the user has some familiarity with regular expressions. Basically, it replaces the original_file_name in the output of ls with "mv -v original_file_name new_file_name" and passes the output to sh. Show Sample Output


    -2
    ls /some/directory | sed -rn -e 's/input_file_regex/mv -v & output_file_name/p' | sh
    polar · 2009-03-25 09:20:15 4
  • Tail is much faster than sed, awk because it doesn't check for regular expressions. Show Sample Output


    -5
    tail -n +<N> <file> | head -n 1
    qweqq · 2011-09-30 08:30:30 2
  • What happens if there is more than a single space between words, or spaces and tabs? This command will remove duplicate spaces and tabs. The "-r" switch allows for extended regular expressions. No additional piping necessary.


    0
    sed -r 's/[ \t\r\n\v\f]+/\^J/g' INFILE > OUTFILE
    qazwart · 2009-07-08 19:59:33 0
  • Ever use 'locate' to find a common phrase in a filename or directory name? Often you'll get a huge list of matches, many of which are redundant, and typically the results are not sorted. This command will 'locate' your search phrase, then show you a sorted list of just the relevant directories, with no duplications. So, for example, maybe you have installed several versions of the java jre and you want to track down every directory where files matching "java" might exist. Well, a 'locate java' is likely to return a huge list with many repeated directories since many files in one directory could contain the phrase "java". This command will whittle down the results to a minimal list of unique directory names where your search phrase finds a match.


    2
    for i in $(locate your_search_phrase); do dirname $i; done | sort | uniq
    realbrewer · 2009-02-05 14:03:20 2

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: