make computer speaking to you :)

tail -f /var/log/messages | espeak
you can listen to your computer, but don't be carried away

1
By: dmytrish
2011-04-08 10:24:49

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What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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