Watching directories

watch -n1 "ls -p | grep '/$'"

0
By: dbykov
2011-10-26 09:21:27

These Might Interest You

  • CHANGELOG Version 1.1 removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } BUG FIX: Folders with spaces Version 1.0 removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } BUG FIX: Hidden directories (.dotdirectory) Version 0.9 rmdir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD. Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } Removes current directory with recursive and force flags plus basic human check. When prompted type yes 1. [user@host ~]$ ls foo bar 2. [user@host ~]$ cd foo 3. [user@host foo]$ removedir 4. yes 5. rm -Rf foo/ 6. [user@host ~]$ 7. [user@host ~]$ ls bar Show Sample Output


    -2
    removedir () { echo "Deleting the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-17 11:34:38 3
  • recursively delete empty directories and directories which only contain empty directories using zsh globbing syntax. ** is for recursive globbing. *(/^F) matches all entries that are directories which are not full. If you only want to delete empty directories and not those directories which contained only empty directories and will be empty afterwards, just leave out the options to rmdir: rmdir **/*(/^F)


    0
    rmdir --ignore-fail-on-non-empty -p **/*(/^F)
    xro · 2012-09-18 20:28:46 0
  • This is useful for keeping an eye on an error log while developing. The !^ pulls the first arg from the previous command (which needs to be run in a sub-shell for this shortcut to work).


    2
    (> errors.log) && tail -f !^
    root · 2009-02-03 16:08:19 1
  • This command uses the recursive glob and glob qualifiers from zsh. This will remove all the empty directories from the current directory down. The **/* recurses down through all the files and directories The glob qualifiers are added into the parenthesis. The / means only directories. The F means 'full' directories, and the ^ reverses that to mean non-full directories. For more info on these qualifiers see the zsh docs: http://zsh.dotsrc.org/Doc/Release/Expansion.html#SEC87


    4
    rm -d **/*(/^F)
    claytron · 2009-08-06 21:41:19 2

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