Inserting a decimal every third digit

perl -lpe'1 while s/^([-+]?\d+)(\d{3})/$1.$2/'
self explanatory see sample output
Sample Output
# echo "1234435324523443212343241" | perl -lpe'1 while s/^([-+]?\d+)(\d{3})/$1.$2/'
1.234.435.324.523.443.212.343.241

-2
By: sil
2009-02-18 21:54:22

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What Others Think

sigh. printf "%'d\n" 12345678
pixelbeat · 483 weeks and 2 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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