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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

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Commands by Flameeyes from sorted by
Terminal - Commands by Flameeyes - 7 results
for device in /sys/bus/pci/devices/*; do echo "$(basename ${device} | cut -c '6-') $(cut -c '3-6' ${device}/class): $(cut -c '3-' ${device}/vendor):$(cut -c '3-' ${device}/device)"; done
2012-04-13 03:26:02
User: Flameeyes
Functions: echo

This is a quick replacement for lspci if you need to know what's in a given system but pciutils is not installed. You then need something that can look up the IDs from pci.ids if you want the verbose output.

scanelf --nobanner --recursive --quiet --needed --format "+n#F" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u
2012-03-29 18:30:45
User: Flameeyes
Functions: sort tr

This works in combination with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10496/identify-exported-sonames-in-a-path as it reports the NEEDED entries present in the files within a given path. You can then compare it with the libraries that are exported to make sure that, when cross-building a firmware image, you're not bringing in dependencies from the build host.

The short version of it as can be seen in the same output is

scanelf -RBnq -F "+n#f" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u
scanelf --nobanner --recursive --quiet --soname --format "+S#f"
2012-03-29 18:26:25
User: Flameeyes

This provides a list of shared object names (sonames) that are exported by a given tree. This is usually useful to make sure that a given required dependency (NEEDED entry) is present in a firmware image tree.

The shorter (usable) version for it would be

scanelf -RBSq -F "+S#f"

But I used the verbose parameters in the command above, for explanation.

xmlstarlet sel -t -m '/pkgmetadata/herd' -v . -n -t -m '/pkgmetadata/maintainer' -v email metadata.xml
2010-08-09 22:37:19
User: Flameeyes
Tags: Gentoo

The command requires app-text/xmlstarlet but it otherwise self-contained. It extracts all the herds and all the maintainers' email for a given package and is what I'm using on the Tinderbox to make it easier for me to report bugs.

gdb --batch --quiet -ex "thread apply all bt full" -ex "quit" ${exe} ${corefile}
2010-07-06 14:49:03
User: Flameeyes
Functions: gdb
Tags: gdb

This does almost the same thing as the original, but it runs the full backtrace for _all_ the threads, which is pretty important when reporting a crash for a multithreaded software, since more often than not, the signal handler is executed in a different thread than the crash happened.

qlist --exact "$pkg" | sudo scanelf --needed --quiet --format '%n#F' | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u | qfile --from -
2010-07-06 14:39:15
User: Flameeyes
Functions: sort sudo tr

The output is only partial because runtime dependencies should count in also commands executed via system() and libraries loaded with dlopen(), but at least it gives an idea of what a package directly links to.

Note: this is meaningful *only* if you're using -Wl,--as-needed in your LDFLAGS, otherwise it'll bring you a bunch of false positives.

emerge -av1 `qlist --installed --nocolor | uniq | while read cp; do qlist --exact $cp | while read file; do test -e $file || { echo $cp; echo "$cp: missing $file (and maybe more)" 1>&2; break; }; done; done`
2010-07-04 19:55:42
User: Flameeyes
Functions: echo read test uniq

Revised approach to and3k's version, using pipes and read rather than command substitution. This does not require fiddling with IFS when paths have whitespace, and does not risk hitting command-line size limits.

It's less verbose on the missing files, but it stops iterating at the first file that's missing, so it should be definitely faster.

I expanded all the qlist options to be more self-describing.