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Commands using echo from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using echo - 1,210 results
cat dictionary.txt|while read a; do echo $a|cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda5 sda5 $a && echo KEY FOUND: $a; done
2014-04-16 18:49:53
User: rodolfoap
Functions: cat echo read
0

Lost your luks passphrase? You can always bruteforce from the command line. See the sample output, a simple command using a dictionary.

for a in {p,P}{a,A,4}{s,S,5}{s,S,5}; do echo $a|cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda5 $a && echo KEY FOUND: $a; done
2014-04-16 18:41:50
User: rodolfoap
Functions: echo
0

Lost your luks passphrase? You can always bruteforce from the command line. See the sample output, a simple command for the "pass" word, using combinations of upper/lowercase or number replacement. The generated combinations are:

for a in {p,P}{a,A,4}{s,S,5}{s,S,5}; do echo $a; done

pass

pasS

pas5

paSs

paSS

paS5

...

for id in `ls -1 ~/.ssh | grep -v "authorized\|known_hosts\|config\|\."` ; do echo -n "$id: " ; ssh-keygen -l -f .ssh/$id ; done
2014-04-16 14:12:20
User: drockney
Functions: echo grep id ssh-keygen
0

Find all private keys and dump their fingerprints.

echo thisIsATest | sed -r 's/([A-Z])/_\L\1/g'
2014-04-11 13:36:08
User: flatcap
Functions: echo sed
Tags: sed
1

Convert a camelCase string into snake_case.

To complement senorpedro's command.

echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-") | sudo tee /sys/bus/usb/drivers/usb/unbind
2014-04-06 12:06:29
User: tweet78
Functions: awk cut df echo grep head sudo tail tee tr
19

You have an external USB drive or key.

Apply this command (using the file path of anything on your device) and it will simulate the unplug of this device.

If you just want the port, just type :

echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-")

for i in {1..256};do p=" $i";echo -e "${p: -3} \\0$(($i/64*100+$i%64/8*10+$i%8))";done|cat -t|column -c120
2014-04-04 16:54:53
User: AskApache
Functions: cat column echo
5

Prints out an ascii chart using builtin bash! Then formats using cat -t and column.

The best part is:

echo -e "${p: -3} \\0$(( $i/64*100 + $i%64/8*10 + $i%8 ))";

From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/ascii-codes-and-reference.html

echo "this_is_a_test" | sed -r 's/_([a-z])/\U\1/g'
echo 1395767373016 | gawk '{print strftime("%c", ( $0 + 500 ) / 1000 )}'
find . -name '*.mp3' | sort | while read -r mp3; do echo -e "<h3>$mp3</h3>\n<audio controls src=\"$mp3\"></audio>"; done > index.html; python -m http.server
2014-03-24 15:01:49
User: hendry
Functions: echo find python read sort
Tags: audio browser
1

I tried a few curses based mp3 players for playing back choir practice songs for my wife.

Unfortunately none of the ones I tried were capable of scrubbing a track.

Firefox saves the day.

while read i; do [ ${#i} -gt 72 ] && echo "$i"; done < /path/to/file
2014-03-20 12:27:06
User: flatcap
Functions: echo read
1

Filter out lines of input that contain 72, or fewer, characters.

This uses bash only. ${#i} is the number of characters in variable i.

alias ...='while read line; do echo -n "."; done && echo ""'
alias oath='temp=$(pbpaste) && oathtool --base32 --totp "YOUR SEED HERE" | pbcopy && sleep 3 && echo -n $temp | pbcopy'
2014-03-14 19:21:18
Functions: alias echo sleep
0

Typing a word in terminal is easier than digging your phone out, opening your two-factor authentication app and typing the code in manually.

This alias copies the one-time code to your clipboard for 3 seconds (long enough to paste it into a web form), then restores whatever was on the clipboard beforehand.

This command works on Mac. Replace pbpaste/pbcopy with your distribution's versions.

for gz in `find . -type f -name '*.gz' -print`; do f=`basename $gz .gz` && d=`dirname $gz` && echo -n `ls -s $gz` "... " && gunzip -c $gz | bzip2 - -c > $d/$f.bz2 && rm -f $gz && echo `ls -s $d/$f.bz2`; done
2014-03-13 08:36:24
User: pdwalker
Functions: bzip2 echo gunzip rm
0

- recompresses all gz files to bz2 files from this point and below in the directory tree

- output shows the size of the original file, and the size of the new file. Useful.

- conceptually easier to understand than playing tricks with awk and sed.

- don't like output? Use the following line:

for gz in `find . -type f -name '*.gz' -print`; do f=`basename $gz .gz` && d=`dirname $gz` && gunzip -c $gz | bzip2 - -c > $d/$f.bz2 && rm -f $gz ; done
inotifywait -mr -e CREATE $HOME/bin/ | while read i; do chmod +x $(echo "$i" | sed 's/ \S* //'); done
arecord -q -f cd -d 1 recvol.wav;sox recvol.wav -n stat 2>&1|grep RMS|grep amplitude|cut -d"." -f2|cut -c 1-2>recvol;echo $((`cat recvol`+1))>recvol;rec -t wav - silence 1 0.1 `cat recvol` -1 1.0 `cat recvol`%|lame -s 44.1 -a -v - >record.mp3
2014-02-27 23:23:55
User: geaplanet
Functions: arecord cd cut echo grep stat
0

It find out the mic recording level at the moment of run the command and if a noise level is higher it starts to record an mp3 file. The resulting file will have only the sounds not the silences.

find . -type d| while read i; do echo $(ls -1 "$i"|wc -m) $(du -s "$i"); done|sort -s -n -k1,1 -k2,2 |awk -F'[ \t]+' '{ idx=$1$2; if (array[idx] == 1) {print} else if (array[idx]) {print array[idx]; print; array[idx]=1} else {array[idx]=$0}}'
2014-02-25 22:50:09
User: knoppix5
Functions: awk du echo find ls read sort wc
0

Very quick! Based only on the content sizes and the character counts of filenames. If both numbers are equal then two (or more) directories seem to be most likely identical.

if in doubt apply:

diff -rq path_to_dir1 path_to_dir2

AWK function taken from here:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2912224/find-duplicates-lines-based-on-some-delimited-fileds-on-line

edrv() { N=${1:-edrv}; truncate -s ${2:-256m} $N.img && L=$(losetup -f) && losetup $L $N.img && cryptsetup luksFormat --batch-mode $L && cryptsetup luksOpen $L $N && mkfs.vfat /dev/mapper/$N -n $N; cryptsetup luksClose $N; echo losetup -d $L to unmount; }
2014-02-24 01:38:21
User: snipertyler
Functions: echo losetup
2

You need to be root to do this. So check the command before running it.

You enter the same password for

Enter LUKS passphrase:

Verify passphrase:

Enter passphrase for /dev/loopn:

___

You can then copy the .img file to somewhere else.

Loop it it with losetup -f IMAGENAME.img and then mount it with a file manager (eg nemo) or run mount /dev/loopn /media/mountfolder

Acts similar to a mounted flash drive

echo "select a, b, c from table where a = 3;"| python -c "import sys;import sqlparse;print sqlparse.format(sys.stdin.read(), reindent=True, keyword_case='upper')"
2014-02-21 23:17:15
User: hide1713
Functions: echo python
0

You need to apt-get install python-sqlparse. This command simply formats a sql query and prints it out. It is very useful when you want to move a sql query from commandline to a shell script. Everything is done locally, so you don't need to worry about copying sql query to external websites.

echo -n text | hexdump -C
2014-02-21 09:15:15
User: Tomofumi
Functions: echo hexdump
Tags: sed hex ascii
0

hexdump could be used for conversion too!

echo -n "string" | md5sum|cut -f 1 -d " "
2014-02-20 22:44:00
User: labadf
Functions: cut echo
0

echo defaults to include a newline character at the end of the string, which messes with the hash. If you suppress it with -n then it has the same effect as PHP's ?echo md5("string"), "\t-";? Even more, by using cut you get the exact same output, so it works as a drop-in replacement for the original command for this thread.

echo "Memory:" $(dmidecode --type memory | grep " MB" | awk '{sum += $2; a=sum/1024} END {print a}') "GB"
cmd1 && cmd2 && echo success || echo epic fail
any command | while read line; do echo "[`date -Iseconds`] $line"; done
2014-02-07 22:27:29
User: ayosec
Functions: command echo read
2

Useful to add a timestamp to every line printed to stdout.

You can use `-Ins` instead of `-Iseconds` if you want more precision.

YYYY=2014; MM=02; for d in $(cal $MM $YYYY | grep "^ *[0-9]"); do DD=$(printf "%02d" $d); echo $YYYY$MM$DD; done
2014-02-06 11:31:57
User: fibo
Functions: cal echo grep printf
Tags: cal for loop
1

Edit YYYY and MM at the beginning of the command with the year and month you want.

Note that `DD=$(printf "%02d" $d)` will pad single digit integers with a leading zero.

Substitute `echo $YYYY$MM$DD` at the end of the line with the command you want to launch, for instance

script.pl --yyyymmdd $YYYY$MM$DD

find . -name "*.URL" | while read file ; do cat "$file" | sed 's/InternetShortcut/Desktop Entry/' | sed '/^\(URL\|\[\)/!d' > "$file".desktop && echo "Type=Link" >> "$file".desktop ; done