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Commands using tee from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using tee - 95 results
sudo tee /path/to/file < /dev/null
tee < file.org file.copy1 file.copy2 [file.copyn] > /dev/null
2014-10-02 16:41:36
User: dacoman
Functions: tee
0

Copies file.org to file.copy1 ... file.copyn

tail -1f /var/opt/fds/logs/TraceEventLogFile.txt.0 | grep <msisdn> | tee <test-case-id>.trace | tr '|' '\n'
2014-08-21 19:29:07
User: neomefistox
Functions: grep tail tee tr
0

This command allows to follow up a trace on SDP (CS5.2), at the same time as the trace records are stored in the file with "raw" format.

Trace files in native format are useful to filter the records before to translation from '|' to '\n'.

Example:

grep -v OP_GET <raw-records>.trace | tr '|' '\n'
mysqldump -pyourpass --single-transaction --master-data=2 -q --flush-logs --databases db_for_doslave |tee /home/db_bak.sql |ssh mysqladmin@slave.db.com "mysql"
2014-08-11 05:57:21
User: dragonwei
Functions: ssh tee
0

get master info:

head -n 40 /home/db_bak.sql |awk '$0~/MASTER_LOG_FILE/

slave server:

change master ??.

start slave

bkname="test"; tobk="*" ; totalsize=$(du -csb $tobk | tail -1 | cut -f1) ; tar cvf - $tobk | tee >(sha512sum > $bkname.sha512) >(tar -tv > $bkname.lst) | mbuffer -m 4G -P 100% | pv -s $totalsize -w 100 | dd of=/dev/nst0 bs=256k
2014-07-22 15:47:50
User: johnr
Functions: cut dd du tail tar tee
0

This will write to TAPE (LTO3-4 in my case) a backup of files/folders. Could be changed to write to DVD/Blueray.

Go to the directory where you want to write the output files : cd /bklogs

Enter a name in bkname="Backup1", enter folders/files in tobk="/home /var/www".

It will create a tar and write it to the tape drive on /dev/nst0.

In the process, it will

1) generate a sha512 sum of the tar to $bkname.sha512; so you can validate that your data is intact

2) generate a filelist of the content of the tar with filesize to $bkname.lst

3) buffer the tar file to prevent shoe-shining the tape (I use 4GB for lto3(80mb/sec), 8gb for lto4 (120mb/sec), 3Tb usb3 disks support those speed, else I use 3x2tb raidz.

4) show buffer in/out speed and used space in the buffer

5) show progress bar with time approximation using pv

ADD :

To eject the tape :

; sleep 75; mt-st -f /dev/nst0 rewoffl

TODO:

1) When using old tapes, if the buffer is full and the drive slows down, it means the tape is old and would need to be replaced instead of wiping it and recycling it for an other backup. Logging where and when it slows down could provide good information on the wear of the tape. I don't know how to get that information from the mbuffer output and to trigger a "This tape slowed down X times at Y1gb, Y2gb, Y3gb down to Zmb/s for a total of 30sec. It would be wise to replace this tape next time you want to write to it."

2) Fix filesize approximation

3) Save all the output to $bkname.log with progress update being new lines. (any one have an idea?)

4) Support spanning on multiple tape.

5) Replace tar format with something else (dar?); looking at xar right now (https://code.google.com/p/xar/), xml metadata could contain per file checksum, compression algorithm (bzip2, xv, gzip), gnupg encryption, thumbnail, videopreview, image EXIF... But that's an other project.

TIP:

1) You can specify the width of the progressbar of pv. If its longer than the terminal, line refresh will be written to new lines. That way you can see if there was speed slowdown during writing.

2) Remove the v in tar argument cvf to prevent listing all files added to the archive.

3) You can get tarsum (http://www.guyrutenberg.com/2009/04/29/tarsum-02-a-read-only-version-of-tarsum/)

and add >(tarsum --checksum sha256 > $bkname_list.sha256) after the tee to generate checksums of individual files !

echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-") | sudo tee /sys/bus/usb/drivers/usb/unbind
2014-04-06 12:06:29
User: tweet78
Functions: awk cut df echo grep head sudo tail tee tr
29

You have an external USB drive or key.

Apply this command (using the file path of anything on your device) and it will simulate the unplug of this device.

If you just want the port, just type :

echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-")

command_line 2>&1 | tee -a output_file
num_errs=`grep ERROR /var/log/syslog | tee >(cat >&2) | wc -l`
2014-03-12 00:04:24
Functions: cat tee wc
0

Many circumstances call for creating variable of a summary result while still printing the original pipe. Inserting "tee >(cat >&2)" allows the command output to still be printed while permitting the same output to be processed into a variable.

ssh USER@HOST cat REMOTE_FILE.mp4 | tee LOCAL_FILE.mp4 | mplayer -
2013-11-28 11:25:26
User: flatcap
Functions: cat ssh tee
6

Securely stream a file from a remote server (and save it locally).

Useful if you're impatient and want to watch a movie immediately and download it at the same time without using extra bandwidth.

This is an extension of snipertyler's idea.

Note: This command uses an encrypted connection, unlike the original.

nc HOST PORT | tee movie.mp4 | mplayer -
2013-11-28 01:38:29
User: snipertyler
Functions: tee
7

Requires a listening port on HOST

eg. "cat movie.mp4 | nc -l 1356 " (cat movie.mp4 | nc -l PORT)

Useful if you're impatient and want to watch a movie immediately and download it at the same time without using extra bandwidth.

You can't seek (it'll crash and kill the stream) but you can pause it.

:w !sudo tee %
dd if=file | tee >(sha1sum) >(md5sum) >(sha256sum) >/dev/null
2013-11-07 17:43:54
User: dubbaluga
Functions: dd tee
Tags: tee parallel I/O
0

This is to overcome the issue of slow I/O by reading once and forwarding the output to several processes (e. g. 3 in the given command). One could also invoke grep or other programs to work on read data.

ssh remoteUser@remoteHost "tail -f /var/log/scs/remoteLogName" | tee localLogName
:w !sudo tee %
logger -tdnsupdate $(curl -s 'https://dynamicdns.park-your-domain.com/update?host=@&domain=xxx&password=xxx'|tee -a /root/dnsupdate|perl -pe'/Count>(\d+)<\/Err/;$_=$1eq"0"?"Update Sucessful":"Update failed"'&&date>>/root/dnsupdate)
2013-08-11 16:27:39
User: MagisterQuis
Functions: logger perl tee
1

Sets the @ A record for your domain hosted by namecheap to your current internet-facing IP address, logs success or failure with syslog, and logs the data returned to /root/dnsupdate.

Change the XXX's as appropriate.

More info at: http://www.namecheap.com/support/knowledgebase/article.aspx/29/

psgrep() { ps aux | tee >(head -1>&2) | grep -v " grep $@" | grep "$@" -i --color=auto; }
2013-08-02 12:44:32
User: fnl
Functions: grep head ps tee
Tags: grep ps
0

Pipes the header row of ps to STDERR, then greps for the command on the output of ps, removing the grep entry before that.

echo 'Etc/UTC' | tee /etc/timezone; dpkg-reconfigure --frontend noninteractive tzdata
2013-04-22 06:14:55
User: donatello
Functions: echo tee
0

Replace the first part of the command above with the appropriate timezone string. Eg: 'Europe/London' or for UTC - 'Etc/UTC'. The appropriate string can be found from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tz_database_time_zones

This is useful when your server is installed by a data centre (managed hardware, VPS, etc) and the timezone is not usually set to the one your prefer.

script -qf | tee >(nc -l -p 5000)
wget -O- http://example.com/mytarball.tgz | tee mytarball.tgz | tar xzv
2013-03-06 11:11:28
Functions: tar tee wget
0

Very similar as doing "wget http://example.com/mytarball|tar xzv", this one involves the "tee" command between both, which will simultaneously write the tarball and copy it to stdout. So this command will locally save the tarball and extract it - both at the same time while it downloads.

echo 'foo' | tee >(wc -c) >(grep o) >(grep f)
2013-01-31 09:54:18
User: totti
Functions: echo grep tee wc
Tags: tee output input
5

Output of a command as input to many

tee >(openssl md5 > sum.md5) <somefile | bzip2 > somefile.bz2
cat somefile | tee >(openssl md5 > sum.md5) | bzip2 > somefile.bz2
cat myfile | tee dest1 dest2 > /dev/null 2>&1
find . -printf "touch -m -d \"%a\" '%p'\n" | tee /tmp/retime.sh
2012-11-05 20:32:05
User: dmmst19
Functions: find tee
4

Sometimes when copying files from one place to another, the timestamps get lost. Maybe you forgot to add a flag to preserve timestamps in your copy command. You're sure the files are exactly the same in both locations, but the timestamps of the files in the new home are wrong and you need them to match the source.

Using this command, you will get a shell script (/tmp/retime.sh) than you can move to the new location and just execute - it will change the timestamps on all the files and directories to their previous values. Make sure you're in the right directory when you launch it, otherwise all the touch commands will create new zero-length files with those names. Since find's output includes "." it will also change the timestamp of the current directory.

Ideally rsync would be the way to handle this - since it only sends changes by default, there would be relatively little network traffic resulting. But rsync has to read the entire file contents on both sides to be sure no bytes have changed, potentially causing a huge amount of local disk I/O on each side. This could be a problem if your files are large. My approach avoids all the comparison I/O. I've seen comments that rsync with the "--size-only" and "--times" options should do this also, but it didn't seem to do what I wanted in my test. With my approach you can review/edit the output commands before running them, so you can tell exactly what will happen.

The "tee" command both displays the output on the screen for your review, AND saves it to the file /tmp/retime.sh.

Credit: got this idea from Stone's answer at http://serverfault.com/questions/344731/rsync-copying-over-timestamps-only?rq=1, and combined it into one line.

command 3>&1 1>&2 2>&3 | tee -a file
2012-10-30 15:40:08
User: netkill
Functions: command tee
0

Appends output to the file, some systems require the -a to do this.