Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

2011-03-12 - Confoo 2011 presentation
Slides are available from the commandlinefu presentation at Confoo 2011: http://presentations.codeinthehole.com/confoo2011/
2011-01-04 - Moderation now required for new commands
To try and put and end to the spamming, new commands require moderation before they will appear on the site.
2010-12-27 - Apologies for not banning the trolls sooner
Have been away from the interwebs over Christmas. Will be more vigilant henceforth.
2010-09-24 - OAuth and pagination problems fixed
Apologies for the delay in getting Twitter's OAuth supported. Annoying pagination gremlin also fixed.
Hide

Tags

Hide

Functions

Commands tagged grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged grep - 336 results
grep URL ~/annex/.git/annex/webapp.html | tr -d '">' | awk -F= '{print $4 "=" $5}'
find -type f -exec grep -q "regexp" {} \; -delete
2014-04-06 19:06:50
User: gumnos
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep
3

Deletes files in the current directory or its subdirectories that match "regexp" but handle directories, newlines, spaces, and other funky characters better than the original #13315. Also uses grep's "-q" to be quiet and quit at the first match, making this much faster. No need for awk either.

grep -Rl "pattern" files_or_dir
2014-04-06 18:18:07
User: N1nsun
Functions: grep
Tags: awk find grep
0

Grep can search files and directories recursively. Using the -Z option and xargs -0 you can get all results on one line with escaped spaces, suitable for other commands like rm.

find . | xargs grep -l "FOOBAR" | awk '{print "rm -f "$1}' > doit.sh
2014-04-06 15:48:41
User: sergeylukin
Functions: awk find grep xargs
Tags: awk find grep
-2

After this command you can review doit.sh file before executing it.

If it looks good, execute: `. doit.sh`

wmic OS get OSArchitecture /value | grep -Eo '[^=]*$'
2014-03-15 02:04:08
User: lowjax
Functions: get grep
0

Using "wmic get * /value" within any Cygwin shell will return lots of Win/Dos newline junk ie "^M$" at the end of found value line, two lines ("$" Unix newline) above, and three below. This makes storing and or evaluating wmic queries as variables a pain. The method i suggest strips the mentioned junk, only returns the value after "OSArchitecture=", and includes only one Unix style newline. Other methods using sed|awk|cut can only handle the output of wmic cleanly when piped or using multiple sed statements.

wmic OS get OSArchitecture /value | sed 's/\r//g;s/^M$//;/^$/d;s/.*=//'

making

wmic OS get OSArchitecture /value | grep -Eo '[^=]*$'

a much cleaner and slightly less costly alternative.

cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep BogoMIPS | uniq | sed 's/^.*://g' | awk '{print($1 / 4) }'
watch -d -n 2 iptables -nvL
2014-02-23 16:35:03
User: xxdesmus
Functions: iptables watch
0

This will highlight (with a box over it) any changes since the last refresh.

find . -name *.properties -exec /bin/echo {} \; -exec cat {} \; | grep -E 'listen|properties'
wget -q -O- http://bitinfocharts.com/markets/btc-e/btc-usd.html |grep -o -P 'lastTrade">([0-9]{1,})(.){0,1}[0-9]{0,}' |grep -o -P '(\d)+(\.){0,1}(\d)*' |head -n 1
ls --color=never -1| grep -E "[0-9]{4}"|sed -re "s/^(.*)([0-9]{4})(.*)$/\2 \1\2\3/" | sort -r
grep -c "search_string" /path/to/file
2013-12-10 18:13:54
User: meatflag
Functions: grep
0

-c will count the number of times your search matches in the file.

function hgr() { grep --color -i "${1}" ~/.bash_history | sed -e 's/^ *//g' -e 's/ *$//g' | sort | uniq; }
% sudo yum remove streams-$(uname-r)
grep -lr "foo" . | xargs sed -i "s/foo/bar/g"
2013-10-28 13:02:47
User: sergeylukin
Functions: grep sed xargs
1

Replace "foo" with "bar" in all files in current directory recursively

dpkg-query -Wf '${Installed-Size}\t${Status}\t${Package}\n' | sort -n | grep installed
wget -q -O- http://example-podcast-feed.com/rss | grep -o "<enclosure[ -~][^>]*" | grep -o "http://[ -~][^\"]*" | xargs wget -c
2013-09-24 12:38:08
User: talha131
Functions: grep wget xargs
0

This script can be used to download enclosed files from a RSS feed. For example, it can be used to download mp3 files from a podcasts RSS feed.

for i in `ip addr show dev eth1 | grep inet | awk '{print $2}' | cut -d/ -f1`; do echo -n $i; echo -en '\t'; host $i | awk '{print $5}'; done
function colorize() { c="--line-buffered --color=yes"; GREP_COLORS="mt=01;34" egrep $c '(^| 200 | 304 )' "${@}" | GREP_COLORS="mt=02;31" egrep $c '(^|"(GET|POST) .*[^0-9] 4[0-1][0-9] )' | GREP_COLORS="ms=02;37" egrep $c '(^|^[0-9\.]+) ';}
2013-08-14 21:05:34
User: mogsie
Functions: egrep
1

Puts a splash of color in your access logs. IP addresses are gray, 200 and 304 are green, all 4xx errors are red. Works well with e.g. "colorize access_log | less -R" if you want to see your colors while paging.

Use as inspiration for other things you might be tailing, like syslog or vmstat

Usage:

tail -f access.log | colorize
psgrep() { ps aux | tee >(head -1>&2) | grep -v " grep $@" | grep "$@" -i --color=auto; }
2013-08-02 12:44:32
User: fnl
Functions: grep head ps tee
Tags: grep ps
0

Pipes the header row of ps to STDERR, then greps for the command on the output of ps, removing the grep entry before that.

for fil in *.JPG; do datepath="$(identify -verbose $fil | grep DateTimeOri | awk '{print $2"_"$3 }' | sed s%:%_%g)"; mv -v $fil $datepath.jpg; done
2013-08-02 01:42:04
Functions: mv
0

Requires ImageMagick.

Extracts date taken from image and renames it properly.

Based on StackOverflow answer.

pgrep -lf
curl -s $1 | grep -o -i '<a href="//images.4chan.org/[^>]*>' | sed -r 's%.*"//([^"]*)".*%\1%' | xargs wget
2013-07-22 10:33:55
User: bugmenot
Functions: grep xargs
1

first grep all href images then sed the url part then wget

ps aux | grep $(echo $1 | sed "s/^\(.\)/[\1]/g")
2013-07-16 10:10:51
User: opexxx
Functions: echo grep ps sed
Tags: sed grep ps
1

grep по ps aux

grep -aEio '([[:alnum:]_.-\+\-]+@[[:alnum:]_.-]+?\.[[:alpha:].]{2,6})'
2013-06-23 21:52:14
User: binarynomad
Functions: grep
Tags: grep email
1

This will catch most separators in the section of the email:

dot .

dash -

underscore _

plus + (added for gmail)

... and the basic dash '-' of host names.

for i in *.pdf; do echo --------$i-------; echo; pdftotext $i - | grep -i Yourpattern; done
2013-05-22 05:36:06
User: fangfufu
Functions: echo grep
Tags: grep pdf
0

This command is useful for searching through a whole folder worth of pdf files.