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Commands tagged cpu usage from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged cpu usage - 7 results
echo "DISK:";df -Pl | grep -v "Filesystem" | awk '{print $5,$6}' ; echo "MEM:" ; free -mto | awk '{ print $1,$2,$3,$4 }'; echo "CPU:"; top -b -d1 -n1 | grep Cpu | awk '{print $2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8,$9}';echo "LOAD:"; cat /proc/loadavg
2014-09-29 12:43:52
User: injez
Functions: awk cat df echo free grep top
0

Monitoring system in one line :

DISK : disk space

MEM: memory ( mem , swap, Total)

CPU : all information about cpu activity

LOAD : load average

Limit kernel compilation load
ps -ef --sort=-%cpu
while :; do sensors|grep ^Core|while read x; do printf '% .23s\n' "$x"; done; sleep 1 && clear; done;
2011-04-20 06:41:57
Functions: grep printf read sleep
1

Watch the temperatures of your CPU cores in real time at the command line. Press CONTROL+C to end.

GORY DETAILS: Your computer needs to support sensors (many laptops, for example, do not). You'll need to install the lm-sensors package if it isn't already installed. And it helps to run the `sensors-detect` command to set up your sensor kernel modules first. At the very end of the sensors-detect interactive shell prompt, answer YES to add the new lines to the list of kernel modules loaded at boot.

taskset 0x00000001 yes > /dev/null &
2011-04-03 07:23:53
User: kerim
Functions: taskset yes
8

For each cpu set mask and then monitor your cpu infos. Temp,load avg. etc.

For example for 2nd cpu or 2nd core

taskset 0x00000002 yes > /dev/null &

For example for 3rd cpu or 3rd core

taskset 0x00000004 yes > /dev/null &

For example for 4th cpu or 4th core

taskset 0x00000008 yes > /dev/null &

Monitor your cpu temp with this command if you want

watch -n1 "acpi -t"

Load avg. from top command

top

kerim@bayner.com

http://www.bayner.com/

command ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -vsz -A|sed -u '/^ *PID/d;10q'
2

I've wanted this for a long time, finally just sat down and came up with it. This shows you the sorted output of ps in a pretty format perfect for cron or startup scripts. You can sort by changing the k -vsz to k -pmem for example to sort by memory instead.

If you want a function, here's one from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

aa_top_ps(){ local T N=${1:-10};T=${2:-vsz}; ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -${T} -A|sed -u "/^ *PID/d;${N}q"; }
sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'
9

I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server.

So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg.

Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time.